Chronic vagus nerve stimulation for treatment-resistant depression increases regional cerebral blood flow in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex

Markus Kosel, Holger Brockmann, Caroline Frick, Astrid Zobel, Thomas E. Schlaepfer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in depressed patients. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed by [99mTc]-HMPAO-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after 10weeks of VNS in patients participating in an open, uncontrolled European multi-center study investigating efficacy and safety of VNS. Patients suffered from major depression, with a baseline score of≥20 on the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and had been unsuccessfully treated with at least two adequately prescribed antidepressant drugs. Data of 15 patients could be analyzed using SPM 2. After 10weeks of VNS (20Hz, 500μs pulse width, stimulation during 30s every 5min at the maximal comfortable level) rCBF was increased in the left dorsolateral/ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 47) and decreased in the right posterior cingulate area, the lingual gyrus and the left insula. Our findings are in line with earlier results which showed that VNS increases rCBF in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The modulation of the activity in this region could be associated with the antidepressant efficacy of VNS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-159
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume191
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 31 2011

Keywords

  • Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
  • SPECT
  • Treatment-resistant depression
  • VNS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chronic vagus nerve stimulation for treatment-resistant depression increases regional cerebral blood flow in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this