Chronic fatigue in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome—Hypermobile type

Alan Hakim, Inge De Wandele, Chris O'Callaghan, Alan Pocinki, Peter Rowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chronic fatigue is an important contributor to impaired health-related quality of life in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. There is overlap in the symptoms and findings of EDS and chronic fatigue syndrome. A proportion of those with CFS likely have EDS that has not been identified. The evaluation of chronic fatigue in EDS needs to include a careful clinical examination and laboratory testing to exclude common causes of fatigue including anemia, hypothyroidisim, and chronic infection, as well as dysfunction of major physiological or organ systems. Other problems that commonly contribute to fatigue in EDS include sleep disorders, chronic pain, deconditioning, cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, bowel and bladder dysfunction, psychological issues, and nutritional deficiencies. While there is no specific pharmacological treatment for fatigue, many medications are effective for specific symptoms (such as headache, menstrual dysfunction, or myalgia) and for co-morbid conditions that result in fatigue, including orthostatic intolerance and insomnia. Comprehensive treatment of fatigue needs to also evaluate for biomechanical problems that are common in EDS, and usually involves skilled physical therapy and attention to methods to prevent deconditioning. In addition to managing specific symptoms, treatment of fatigue in EDS also needs to focus on maintaining function and providing social, physical, and nutritional support, as well as providing on-going medical evaluation of new problems and review of new evidence about proposed treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-180
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics
Volume175
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Cardiovascular Deconditioning
Orthostatic Intolerance
Therapeutics
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Nutritional Support
Myalgia
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Malnutrition
Chronic Pain
Headache
Anemia
Urinary Bladder
Quality of Life
Pharmacology
Psychology
Infection

Keywords

  • Ehlers Danlos
  • fatigue
  • hypermobility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Chronic fatigue in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome—Hypermobile type. / Hakim, Alan; De Wandele, Inge; O'Callaghan, Chris; Pocinki, Alan; Rowe, Peter.

In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics, Vol. 175, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 175-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hakim, Alan ; De Wandele, Inge ; O'Callaghan, Chris ; Pocinki, Alan ; Rowe, Peter. / Chronic fatigue in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome—Hypermobile type. In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics. 2017 ; Vol. 175, No. 1. pp. 175-180.
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