Chronic facial pain: Trigeminal neuralgia, persistent idiopathic facial pain, and myofascial pain syndrome—an evidence-based narrative review and etiological hypothesis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), the most common form of severe facial pain, may be confused with an ill-defined persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP). Facial pain is reviewed and a detailed discussion of TN and PIFP is presented. A possible cause for PIFP is proposed. (1) Methods: Databases were searched for articles related to facial pain, TN, and PIFP. Relevant articles were selected, and all systematic reviews and meta-analyses were included. (2) Discussion: The lifetime prevalence for TN is approximately 0.3% and for PIFP approximately 0.03%. TN is 15–20 times more common in persons with multiple sclerosis. Most cases of TN are caused by neurovascular compression, but a significant number are secondary to inflammation, tumor or trauma. The cause of PIFP remains unknown. Well-established TN treatment protocols include pharmacotherapy, neurotoxin denervation, peripheral nerve ablation, focused radiation, and microvascular decompression, with high rates of relief and varying degrees of adverse outcomes. No such protocols exist for PIFP. (3) Conclusion: PIFP may be confused with TN, but treatment possibilities differ greatly. Head and neck muscle myofascial pain syndrome is suggested as a possible cause of PIFP, a consideration that could open new approaches to treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7012
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Keywords

  • Chronic facial pain
  • Myofascial pain syndrome
  • Persistent idiopathic facial pain
  • Trigeminal neuralgia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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