Chondrogenic differentiation of human embryonic germ cell derived cells in hydrogels

Shyni Varghese, Paranduangji Theprungsirikul, Angela Ferran, Nathaniel Hwang, Adam Canver, Jennifer Elisseeff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Human embryonic germ (hEG) cells have the potential to self-renew over long periods of time and differentiate into various lineages. Cells derived from embryoid bodies of hEG cells express a broad spectrum of gene markers and have been induced towards cells of ectodermal and recently endo-dermal and mesenchymal lineages. LVEC cells express a number of surface marker proteins characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), indicating the potential of these cells to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues. Here we demonstrate the homogenous differentiation of LVEC cells into hyaline cartilage. Three dimensional tissue formation is achieved by encapsulating cells in synthetic hydrogels followed by incubation in chondrocyte-conditioned culture medium. Homogenous hyaline cartilage was produced, even after 63 population doublings (13 passages). The high proliferative capacity of these cells without teratoma formation, homogenous differentiation, and three-dimensional cartilage tissue formation suggests the significant potential of LVEC cells for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
Pages2643-2646
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 30 2006Sep 3 2006

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

Other28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period8/30/069/3/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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