CHOLERA EPIDEMIOLOGY - SOME ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS.

Wiley H Mosley, Moslemuddin Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cholera has a distinctive epidemiological pattern. Epidemics, even in endemic areas, are sharply localized in time and place. The ″place″ specificity points to the essential requirement for water to facilitate disease transmission. The age, sex, occupational risks of disease are primarily related to exposure to contaminated water. This exposure may, however, involve small doses of V. cholerae ingested in water while rinsing the mouth, utensils, fresh vegetables, or with fish, especially shellfish. The epidemiological pattern of cholera contrasts so greatly with that of other diarrheal diseases, that it appears inappropriate to make any general classification of the spread or control of these diseases without etiology-specific study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-316
Number of pages8
JournalProgress in Water Technology
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Epidemiology
cholera
Cholera
epidemiology
Water
diarrheal disease
Shellfish
disease transmission
Occupational Diseases
Occupational risks
etiology
shellfish
Vegetables
water
vegetable
Mouth
Fishes
Fish
fish
exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

CHOLERA EPIDEMIOLOGY - SOME ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS. / Mosley, Wiley H; Khan, Moslemuddin.

In: Progress in Water Technology, Vol. 11, No. 2, 1978, p. 309-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mosley, Wiley H ; Khan, Moslemuddin. / CHOLERA EPIDEMIOLOGY - SOME ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS. In: Progress in Water Technology. 1978 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 309-316.
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