Chloroquine improves survival and hematopoietic recovery after lethal low-dose-rate radiation

Yiting Lim, Mohammad Hedayati, Akil A. Merchant, Yonggang Zhang, Hsiang Hsuan M Yu, Michael B. Kastan, William Matsui, Theodore DeWeese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection against the harmful effects of LDR radiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)800-806
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Fingerprint

Chloroquine
ataxia
mice
recovery
Radiation
Ataxia Telangiectasia
dosage
radiation
bone marrow
Bone Marrow Cells
cells
Flow Cytometry
Stem Cells
tibia
injection
Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins
radiation injuries
transplantation
body weight
Congenic Mice

Keywords

  • Ataxia telangiectasia mutated
  • Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein activation
  • Chloroquine
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells
  • Low-dose-rate radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Chloroquine improves survival and hematopoietic recovery after lethal low-dose-rate radiation. / Lim, Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang, Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang Hsuan M; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, Vol. 84, No. 3, 01.11.2012, p. 800-806.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lim, Yiting ; Hedayati, Mohammad ; Merchant, Akil A. ; Zhang, Yonggang ; Yu, Hsiang Hsuan M ; Kastan, Michael B. ; Matsui, William ; DeWeese, Theodore. / Chloroquine improves survival and hematopoietic recovery after lethal low-dose-rate radiation. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics. 2012 ; Vol. 84, No. 3. pp. 800-806.
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AU - Yu, Hsiang Hsuan M

AU - Kastan, Michael B.

AU - Matsui, William

AU - DeWeese, Theodore

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