Children's participation in genetic prevalence research: Influences on enrollment and reports of parent satisfaction

Michèle M.M. Mazzocco, Karen H. Harum, Gwen F. Myers, Allan L. Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present studies were designed to evaluate methodological influences on the efficiency of genetic-screening studies, specifically when enrolling preschoolers in a prevalence study of the fragile X full mutation. The studies include replication of earlier findings with school-age children, which showed that (a) a higher enrollment rate occurred when the study was introduced to a parent by a physician (73.7%) versus by a research assistant (58.7%), and (b) parents initially undecided about participating were more likely to eventually enroll if they had completed enrollment forms at the time of recruitment. In-person recruitment led to higher enrollment rates (60%) than did recruitment by mail (36.8%). Feedback from parents indicated the importance of emphasizing the optional nature of participation in screening studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2308-2327
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume29
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Children's participation in genetic prevalence research: Influences on enrollment and reports of parent satisfaction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this