Children with haemophilus influenzae bacteremia initially treated as outpatients: Outcome in 85 American Indian children

Margaret Mary Cortese, Julius Geopp, Janne Almeido-Hill, Carol Barlage, Timothy Collins, Matt Hohenboken, Raymond Reid, Mathuram Santosham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Eighty–five American Indian children less than 16 years of age with Haemophilus influenzae bacteremia were retrospectively determined to have been treated as outpatients after their initial evluation. We hoped to determine the proportion that developed new foci, the time interval to this development and whether age or temperature at presentation predicted outcome. Fifty–one (60%) presented with nonfocal findings. Seventy–two (85%) were treated with antibiotics at the initial visit. Although 49 (58%) of the patients were never hospitalized, a new focus was identified in 25 (29%), including 13 (15%) with a final diagnosis of meningitis. The new foci were identified within 6 days of presentation (median, 2 days). An additional 15 (18%) patients had no new focus but were febrile and/or ill at follow–up. All patients with meningitis or a second positive culture were hospitalized at the first follow–up visit. Age and temperature at presentation did not help predict outcome. All patients with H. influenzae bacteremia require prompt reevaluation and close follow–up by an experienced physician.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-525
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume11
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1992

Keywords

  • American Indian children
  • Bacteremia
  • Haemophilus influenzae
  • Meningitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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