Childbirth and symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety: a prospective birth cohort study

A. F. Bell, C. S. Carter, J. M. Davis, J. Golding, O. Adejumo, M. Pyra, J. J. Connelly, Leah Rubin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We investigated associations between aspects of childbirth and elevated postpartum symptoms of depression and anxiety. We employed secondary analysis of perinatal data (N = 4657–4946) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort. Multivariable logistic regression models (adjusted for covariates) examined predictors of elevated symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety. Predictors included the following: type of delivery (normal physiological vs. interventive non-physiological), immediate postpartum complications, and maternal perception of the recent birth experience. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale assessed elevated symptoms of depression (score ≥ 13), and the Crown-Crisp Experiential Index assessed elevated symptoms of anxiety (score ≥ 9) at 2 and 8 months after delivery. A more negative perception of the recent birth experience was associated with elevated symptoms of anxiety at 2 months [odds ratio (OR) 1.52, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.25–1.85] and 8 months (OR 1.30, 95 % CI 1.06–1.60) postpartum but was not associated with elevated symptoms of depression at either time point. Type of delivery (physiological vs. non-physiological) and immediate postpartum complications were not associated with elevated symptoms of depression or anxiety. Our findings suggest that improving women’s childbirth experience may decrease the likelihood of postpartum anxiety, but not postpartum depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Women's Mental Health
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Postpartum Depression
Cohort Studies
Anxiety
Parturition
Postpartum Period
Depression
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Crowns
Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Mothers

Keywords

  • ALSPAC
  • Anxiety
  • Birth
  • Depression
  • Postpartum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Childbirth and symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety : a prospective birth cohort study. / Bell, A. F.; Carter, C. S.; Davis, J. M.; Golding, J.; Adejumo, O.; Pyra, M.; Connelly, J. J.; Rubin, Leah.

In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.04.2016, p. 219-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bell, AF, Carter, CS, Davis, JM, Golding, J, Adejumo, O, Pyra, M, Connelly, JJ & Rubin, L 2016, 'Childbirth and symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety: a prospective birth cohort study', Archives of Women's Mental Health, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 219-227. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00737-015-0555-7
Bell, A. F. ; Carter, C. S. ; Davis, J. M. ; Golding, J. ; Adejumo, O. ; Pyra, M. ; Connelly, J. J. ; Rubin, Leah. / Childbirth and symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety : a prospective birth cohort study. In: Archives of Women's Mental Health. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 219-227.
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