Child psychiatrists’ views of DSM-III-R

A survey of usage and opinions

Stephen R. Setterberg, Monique Ernst, Uma Rao, Magda Campbell, Gabrielle A. Carlson, David Shaffer, Beatriz M. Staghezza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The DSM-IV Child Psychiatry Work Group surveyed 460 child psychiatrists about their use of DSM-III-R and their reactions to specific proposed nosological revisions for DSM-IV. This paper presents the responses of the sample as a whole and of respondent subgroups with different theoretical, practice, and training characteristics. The survey indicates that DSM-III and DSM-III-R are widely used and generally accepted by child psychiatrists. Ninety-eight percent of respondents believe a criterion-based diagnostic system is useful, and 65% consider DSM-III-R to be an improvement over DSM-III. Depending on the diagnosis, 47% to 66% of the respondents reported that they generally assess all applicable criteria and 28% to 49% often refer to the manual before assigning a diagnosis. A majority of respondents supported proposals for several new diagnostic subtypes. Ninety-three percent of respondents indicated that “adequacy of family support” was very valuable for treatment planning or estimating prognosis. Fifty-five percent of respondents admitted to diagnosing adjustment disorders in order to avoid the stigma associated with other disorders. Child psychiatrists who are psychodynamically oriented or practicing in an office-based setting or out of training for more than 10 years tend to use the DSM-III-R less rigorously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)652-658
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume30
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Adjustment Disorders
Child Psychiatry
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • DSM-III-R
  • DSM-IV
  • Satisfaction
  • Stigma
  • Use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Setterberg, S. R., Ernst, M., Rao, U., Campbell, M., Carlson, G. A., Shaffer, D., & Staghezza, B. M. (1991). Child psychiatrists’ views of DSM-III-R: A survey of usage and opinions. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 30(4), 652-658.

Child psychiatrists’ views of DSM-III-R : A survey of usage and opinions. / Setterberg, Stephen R.; Ernst, Monique; Rao, Uma; Campbell, Magda; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Shaffer, David; Staghezza, Beatriz M.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 30, No. 4, 1991, p. 652-658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Setterberg, SR, Ernst, M, Rao, U, Campbell, M, Carlson, GA, Shaffer, D & Staghezza, BM 1991, 'Child psychiatrists’ views of DSM-III-R: A survey of usage and opinions', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 652-658.
Setterberg SR, Ernst M, Rao U, Campbell M, Carlson GA, Shaffer D et al. Child psychiatrists’ views of DSM-III-R: A survey of usage and opinions. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 1991;30(4):652-658.
Setterberg, Stephen R. ; Ernst, Monique ; Rao, Uma ; Campbell, Magda ; Carlson, Gabrielle A. ; Shaffer, David ; Staghezza, Beatriz M. / Child psychiatrists’ views of DSM-III-R : A survey of usage and opinions. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 1991 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 652-658.
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