Child health promotion program in South Korea in collaboration with US national aeronautics and space administration: Improvement in dietary and nutrition knowledge of young children

Hyunjung Lim, Jieun Kim, Youfa Wang, Jungwon Min, Nubia A. Carvajal, Charles W. Lloyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Childhood obesity has become a global epidemic. Development of effective and sustainable programs to promote healthy behaviors from a young age is important. This study developed and tested an intervention program designed to promote healthy eating and physical activity among young children in South Korea by adaptation of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission X (MX) Program. SUBJECTS/METHODS: The intervention program consisted of 4 weeks of fitness and 2 weeks of nutrition education. A sample of 104 subjects completed pre- and post- surveys on the Children’s Nutrition Acknowledgement Test (NAT). Parents were asked for their children’s characteristics and two 24-hour dietary records, the Nutrition Quotient (NQ) at baseline and a 6-week follow-up. Child weight status was assessed using Korean body mass index (BMI) percentiles. RESULTS: At baseline, 16.4% (boy: 15.4%; girl: 19.2%) of subjects were overweight or obese (based on BMI≥85%tile). Fat consumption significantly decreased in normal BMI children (48.6 ± 16.8 g at baseline to 41.9 ± 18.1 g after intervention, P < 0.05); total NQ score significantly increased from 66.4 to 67.9 (P < 0.05); total NAT score significantly improved in normal BMI children (74.3 at baseline to 81.9 after the program), children being underweight (from 71.0 to 77.0), and overweight children (77.1 at baseline vs. 88.2 after intervention, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The 6-week South Korean NASA MX project is feasible and shows favorable changes in eating behaviors and nutritional knowledge among young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-562
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition Research and Practice
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration
nutrition knowledge
Republic of Korea
health promotion
South Korea
Health Promotion
nutrition
body mass index
childhood obesity
Body Mass Index
underweight
tiles
healthy diet
Diet Records
nutrition education
fat intake
Thinness
eating habits
Pediatric Obesity
physical activity

Keywords

  • Child
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Prevention
  • South Korea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Child health promotion program in South Korea in collaboration with US national aeronautics and space administration : Improvement in dietary and nutrition knowledge of young children. / Lim, Hyunjung; Kim, Jieun; Wang, Youfa; Min, Jungwon; Carvajal, Nubia A.; Lloyd, Charles W.

In: Nutrition Research and Practice, Vol. 10, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 555-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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