Characterizing the role of intersecting stigmas and sustained inequities in driving HIV syndemics across low-to-middle-income settings

Nikita Viswasam, Sheree Schwartz, Stefan Baral

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of reviewIn 2020, key populations around the world still have disproportionate risks for HIV acquisition and experiencing HIV-related syndemics. This review presents current data around HIV-related syndemics among key populations globally, and on the role of intersecting stigmas in producing these syndemics in low-to-middle-income settings.Recent findingsSex workers, sexual and gender minorities, prisoners, and people who use drugs experience high burdens of tuberculosis, sexually transmitted infections, viral hepatitis, and violence linked to heightened HIV-related risks or acquisition. Adverse sexual, reproductive, and mental health outcomes are also common and similarly amplify HIV acquisition and transmission risks, highlighting the need for psychosocial and reproductive health services for key populations.SummaryAchieving the promise of biomedical interventions to support HIV care and prevention requires action towards addressing syndemics of HIV, and the stigmas that reproduce them, among those most marginalized globally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-249
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent opinion in HIV and AIDS
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2020

Keywords

  • HIV
  • key populations
  • sex work
  • stigma
  • syndemics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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