Characterization of patients accepting and refusing routine, voluntary hiv antibody testing in public sexually transmitted disease clinics

Samuel L. Groseclose, Beth Erickson, Thomas C Quinn, David Glasser, Carl H. Campbell, Edward W. Hook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives: To determine the proportion of HIV-infected sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients identified during routine, voluntary HIV counseling and testing and to characterize patients accepting and refusing counseling and testing, we linked data from a blinded HIV seropre-valence survey to data from the HIV counseling and testing program. Goal of this Study: This study characterizes patients accepting and refusing routine HIV counseling and testing in two public STD clinics. Study Design: A cross-sectional, blinded HIV seropreva-lence survey was conducted of 1,232 STD clinic patients offered HIV counseling and testing. Results: HIV seroprevalence was higher among patients who refused voluntary testing (7.8% versus 3.6%, P = 0.001). Patients who refused testing were more likely to report a prior HIV test (45.6% versus 27.2%; P <0.001). Among patients reporting a prior HIV test, differences were noted between reported prior results, both positive and negative, and blinded results. Conclusions: HIV-infected STD patients may not be detected by routine HIV testing, and self-reported HIV results should be confirmed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-35
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
HIV
Antibodies
Counseling
HIV Seroprevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Characterization of patients accepting and refusing routine, voluntary hiv antibody testing in public sexually transmitted disease clinics. / Groseclose, Samuel L.; Erickson, Beth; Quinn, Thomas C; Glasser, David; Campbell, Carl H.; Hook, Edward W.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 21, No. 1, 1994, p. 31-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Groseclose, Samuel L. ; Erickson, Beth ; Quinn, Thomas C ; Glasser, David ; Campbell, Carl H. ; Hook, Edward W. / Characterization of patients accepting and refusing routine, voluntary hiv antibody testing in public sexually transmitted disease clinics. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 1994 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 31-35.
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