Characterization of morphological changes in agglomerates subject to condensation and evaporation using multiple fractal dimensions

G. Ramachandran, Parker C. Reist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Multiple fractal dimensions are used to characterize morphological changes that occur when an aerosol composed of irregularly shaped agglomerates is subject to condensation followed by evaporation. The agglomerates change from a branched, chainlike structure to a more regular, near-spherical or clumplike structure reflected in a decrease in the structural fractal dimension. The textural fractal dimension remains constant because the primary particles, of which the agglomerates are composed, do not change in shape. The degree of supersaturation and the number of condensation-evaporation cycles that the aerosol undergoes are major factors that influence morphological change. Even at low supersaturations, increasing the number of condensation-evaporation cycles makes the agglomerates more regular and thus decreases the structural fractal dimension. The transition point in the Richardson plot is a good indicator of the size of the primary particles in the agglomerate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-442
Number of pages12
JournalAerosol Science and Technology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Pollution

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