Characterization of Central Visual Field Loss in End-stage Glaucoma by Unsupervised Artificial Intelligence

Mengyu Wang, Jorryt Tichelaar, Louis R. Pasquale, Lucy Q. Shen, Michael V. Boland, Sarah R. Wellik, Carlos Gustavo De Moraes, Jonathan S. Myers, Pradeep Ramulu, Miyoung Kwon, Osamah J. Saeedi, Hui Wang, Neda Baniasadi, Dian Li, Peter J. Bex, Tobias Elze

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Importance: Although the central visual field (VF) in end-stage glaucoma may substantially vary among patients, structure-function studies and quality-of-life assessments are impeded by the lack of appropriate characterization of end-stage VF loss. Objective: To provide a quantitative characterization and classification of central VF loss in end-stage glaucoma. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study collected data from 5 US glaucoma services from June 1, 1999, through October 1, 2014. A total of 2912 reliable 10-2 VFs of 1103 eyes from 1010 patients measured after end-stage 24-2 VFs with a mean deviation (MD) of-22 dB or less were included in the analysis. Data were analyzed from March 28, 2018, through May 23, 2019. Main Outcomes and Measures: Central VF patterns were determined by an artificial intelligence algorithm termed archetypal analysis. Longitudinal analyses were performed to investigate whether the development of central VF defect mostly affects specific vulnerability zones. Results: Among the 1103 patients with the most recent VFs, mean (SD) age was 70.4 (14.3) years; mean (SD) 10-2 MD,-21.5 (5.6) dB. Fourteen central VF patterns were determined, including the most common temporal sparing patterns (304 [27.5%]), followed by mostly nasal loss (280 [25.4%]), hemifield loss (169 [15.3%]), central island (120 [10.9%]), total loss (91 [8.3%]), nearly intact field (56 [5.1%]), inferonasal quadrant sparing (42 [3.8%]), and nearly total loss (41 [3.7%]). Location-specific median total deviation analyses partitioned the central VF into a more vulnerable superonasal zone and a less vulnerable inferotemporal zone. At 1-year and 2-year follow-up, new defects mostly occurred in the more vulnerable zone. Initial encroachments on an intact central VF at follow-up were more likely to be from nasal loss (11 [18.4%]; P <.001). One of the nasal loss patterns had a substantial chance at 2-year follow-up (8 [11.0%]; P =.004) to shift to total loss, whereas others did not. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, central VF loss in end-stage glaucoma was found to exhibit characteristic patterns that might be associated with different subtypes. Initial central VF loss is likely to be nasal loss, and 1 specific type of nasal loss is likely to develop into total loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-198
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA ophthalmology
Volume138
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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