Characteristics of substance use and self-injury among American Indian adolescents who have engaged in binge drinking

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Binge drinking appears to be a risk factor, facilitator, and method of suicidal and non-suicidal self-injury for some American Indian (AI) youth. We examined characteristics, patterns, and motivations for binge use among AI adolescents (N = 69; 10-19 years-old) who recently engaged in binge drinking. The majority used alcohol alone (53.7%) or a combination of alcohol and marijuana (31.3%) for their binge event. Gender differences emerged with boys more severely affected than girls. Forty-seven percent reported lifetime suicidal thoughts. This study represents one of the first in-depth examinations of substance use and related behaviors among AI adolescents who have engaged in recent binge use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Binge Drinking
North American Indians
American Indian
adolescent
Wounds and Injuries
alcohol
Alcohols
Cannabis
Motivation
gender-specific factors
examination
event
Substance Use
Self-injury
American Indians
Alcohol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Characteristics of substance use and self-injury among American Indian adolescents who have engaged in binge drinking",
abstract = "Binge drinking appears to be a risk factor, facilitator, and method of suicidal and non-suicidal self-injury for some American Indian (AI) youth. We examined characteristics, patterns, and motivations for binge use among AI adolescents (N = 69; 10-19 years-old) who recently engaged in binge drinking. The majority used alcohol alone (53.7{\%}) or a combination of alcohol and marijuana (31.3{\%}) for their binge event. Gender differences emerged with boys more severely affected than girls. Forty-seven percent reported lifetime suicidal thoughts. This study represents one of the first in-depth examinations of substance use and related behaviors among AI adolescents who have engaged in recent binge use.",
author = "Mary Cwik and Summer Rosenstock and Lauren Tingey and Novalene Goklish and {Larzelere Hinton}, Francen and Rosemarie Suttle and Emily Haroz and Kyle Hill and Mariddie Craig and Barlow, {Mary Allison}",
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T1 - Characteristics of substance use and self-injury among American Indian adolescents who have engaged in binge drinking

AU - Cwik, Mary

AU - Rosenstock, Summer

AU - Tingey, Lauren

AU - Goklish, Novalene

AU - Larzelere Hinton, Francen

AU - Suttle, Rosemarie

AU - Haroz, Emily

AU - Hill, Kyle

AU - Craig, Mariddie

AU - Barlow, Mary Allison

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