Characteristics of a random sample of emergency food program users in New York: II. Soup kitchens

J. Bowering, Kate Clancy, J. Poppendieck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A random sample of soup kitchen clients in New York City was studied and specific comparisons made on various parameters including homelessness. Compared with the general population of low income persons, soup kitchen users were overwhelmingly male, disproportionately African-American, and more likely to live alone. The homeless (41 percent of the sample) were less likely to receive food stamps or free food, or to use food pantries. Fewer of them received Medicaid or had health insurance. Forty-seven percent had no income in contrast to 29 percent of the total sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)914-917
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume81
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Emergencies
Food Assistance
Homeless Persons
Food
Medicaid
Poverty
Health Insurance
African Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Characteristics of a random sample of emergency food program users in New York : II. Soup kitchens. / Bowering, J.; Clancy, Kate; Poppendieck, J.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 81, No. 7, 1991, p. 914-917.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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