Characterisation of progenitor cells in human atherosclerotic vessels

Evelyn Torsney, Kaushik Mandal, Alison Halliday, Marjan Jahangiri, Qingbo Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent data from animal models has demonstrated that both endothelial and smooth muscle progenitor cells contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. However, no data exists concerning the presence of progenitor cells in human atherosclerotic vessels. In the present study, a range of normal and atherosclerotic human arteries were collected from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Segments of internal mammary artery (normal controls), and segments of proximal ascending aorta with visible fatty streak were analysed. Immunofluorescence was used to detect a panel of progenitor cell markers. A small number of progenitor cells were identified within neointimal lesions and the adventitia with variable expression of CD34, stem cell antigen (Sca-1), c-kit and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) markers, but no CD133 expression. On average there was a two- to three-fold increase in progenitor cell number in the adventitia of atherosclerotic vessels compared with normal controls, with a significant difference (p <0.05) in the frequency of cells expressing VEGFR2. Thus, we have provided the first evidence that vascular progenitor cells exist within atherosclerotic lesions, and identified an increased number of progenitor cells in the adventitia of human atherosclerotic vessels. These cells might be a source for smooth muscle cells (SMCs), macrophages and endothelial cells (ECs) that form atherosclerotic lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume191
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stem Cells
Adventitia
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit
Mammary Arteries
Coronary Artery Bypass
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Blood Vessels
Aorta
Atherosclerosis
Reference Values
Endothelial Cells
Animal Models
Arteries
Cell Count
Macrophages
Antigens

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Endothelial cells
  • Progenitor cells
  • Smooth muscle cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Torsney, E., Mandal, K., Halliday, A., Jahangiri, M., & Xu, Q. (2007). Characterisation of progenitor cells in human atherosclerotic vessels. Atherosclerosis, 191(2), 259-264. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2006.05.033

Characterisation of progenitor cells in human atherosclerotic vessels. / Torsney, Evelyn; Mandal, Kaushik; Halliday, Alison; Jahangiri, Marjan; Xu, Qingbo.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 191, No. 2, 04.2007, p. 259-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Torsney, E, Mandal, K, Halliday, A, Jahangiri, M & Xu, Q 2007, 'Characterisation of progenitor cells in human atherosclerotic vessels', Atherosclerosis, vol. 191, no. 2, pp. 259-264. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2006.05.033
Torsney, Evelyn ; Mandal, Kaushik ; Halliday, Alison ; Jahangiri, Marjan ; Xu, Qingbo. / Characterisation of progenitor cells in human atherosclerotic vessels. In: Atherosclerosis. 2007 ; Vol. 191, No. 2. pp. 259-264.
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