Changing the constitutional landscape for firearms: The US supreme court's recent second amendment decisions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 2 recent cases-with important implications for public health practitioners, courts, and researchers-the US Supreme Court changed the landscape for judging the constitutionality of firearm laws under the Constitution's Second Amendment. In District of Columbia v Heller (2008), the court determined for the first time that the Second Amendment grants individuals a personal right to possess handguns in their home. In McDonald v City of Chicago (2010), the court concluded that this right affects the powers of state and local governments. The court identified broad categories of gun laws-other than handgun bans-that remain presumptively valid but did not provide a standard to judge their constitutionality. We discuss ways that researchers can assist decision makers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2021-2026
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume101
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

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Firearms
Research Personnel
State Government
Local Government
Organized Financing
Constitution and Bylaws
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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