Changing Places and Partners: Associations of Neighborhood Conditions With Sexual Network Turnover Among African American Adults Relocated From Public Housing

Sabriya Linton, Hannah L.F. Cooper, Ruiyan Luo, Conny Karnes, Kristen Renneker, Danielle F. Haley, Emily F. Dauria, Josalin Hunter-Jones, Zev Ross, Gina M. Wingood, Adaora A. Adimora, Loida Bonney, Richard Rothenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neighborhood conditions and sexual network turnover have been associated with the acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, few studies investigate the influence of neighborhood conditions on sexual network turnover. This longitudinal study used data collected across 7 visits from a predominantly substance-misusing cohort of 172 African American adults relocated from public housing in Atlanta, Georgia, to determine whether post-relocation changes in exposure to neighborhood conditions influence sexual network stability, the number of new partners joining sexual networks, and the number of partners leaving sexual networks over time. At each visit, participant and sexual network characteristics were captured via survey, and administrative data were analyzed to describe the census tracts where participants lived. Multilevel models were used to longitudinally assess the relationships of tract-level characteristics to sexual network dynamics over time. On average, participants relocated to neighborhoods that were less economically deprived and violent, and had lower alcohol outlet densities. Post-relocation reductions in exposure to alcohol outlet density were associated with fewer new partners joining sexual networks. Reduced perceived community violence was associated with more sexual partners leaving sexual networks. These associations were marginally significant. No post-relocation changes in place characteristics were significantly associated with overall sexual network stability. Neighborhood social context may influence sexual network turnover. To increase understanding of the social–ecological determinants of HIV/STIs, a new line of research should investigate the combined influence of neighborhood conditions and sexual network dynamics on HIV/STI transmission over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-936
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Public Housing
African Americans
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
HIV
Alcohols
Infectious Disease Transmission
Censuses
Turnover
Sexual
Violence
Longitudinal Studies

Keywords

  • HIV/STIs
  • Longitudinal analysis
  • Neighborhoods
  • Sexual networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Changing Places and Partners : Associations of Neighborhood Conditions With Sexual Network Turnover Among African American Adults Relocated From Public Housing. / Linton, Sabriya; Cooper, Hannah L.F.; Luo, Ruiyan; Karnes, Conny; Renneker, Kristen; Haley, Danielle F.; Dauria, Emily F.; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Ross, Zev; Wingood, Gina M.; Adimora, Adaora A.; Bonney, Loida; Rothenberg, Richard.

In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, Vol. 46, No. 4, 01.05.2017, p. 925-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Linton, S, Cooper, HLF, Luo, R, Karnes, C, Renneker, K, Haley, DF, Dauria, EF, Hunter-Jones, J, Ross, Z, Wingood, GM, Adimora, AA, Bonney, L & Rothenberg, R 2017, 'Changing Places and Partners: Associations of Neighborhood Conditions With Sexual Network Turnover Among African American Adults Relocated From Public Housing', Archives of Sexual Behavior, vol. 46, no. 4, pp. 925-936. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-015-0687-x
Linton, Sabriya ; Cooper, Hannah L.F. ; Luo, Ruiyan ; Karnes, Conny ; Renneker, Kristen ; Haley, Danielle F. ; Dauria, Emily F. ; Hunter-Jones, Josalin ; Ross, Zev ; Wingood, Gina M. ; Adimora, Adaora A. ; Bonney, Loida ; Rothenberg, Richard. / Changing Places and Partners : Associations of Neighborhood Conditions With Sexual Network Turnover Among African American Adults Relocated From Public Housing. In: Archives of Sexual Behavior. 2017 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 925-936.
@article{eb486d9180f741ff9b943002a0b19c63,
title = "Changing Places and Partners: Associations of Neighborhood Conditions With Sexual Network Turnover Among African American Adults Relocated From Public Housing",
abstract = "Neighborhood conditions and sexual network turnover have been associated with the acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, few studies investigate the influence of neighborhood conditions on sexual network turnover. This longitudinal study used data collected across 7 visits from a predominantly substance-misusing cohort of 172 African American adults relocated from public housing in Atlanta, Georgia, to determine whether post-relocation changes in exposure to neighborhood conditions influence sexual network stability, the number of new partners joining sexual networks, and the number of partners leaving sexual networks over time. At each visit, participant and sexual network characteristics were captured via survey, and administrative data were analyzed to describe the census tracts where participants lived. Multilevel models were used to longitudinally assess the relationships of tract-level characteristics to sexual network dynamics over time. On average, participants relocated to neighborhoods that were less economically deprived and violent, and had lower alcohol outlet densities. Post-relocation reductions in exposure to alcohol outlet density were associated with fewer new partners joining sexual networks. Reduced perceived community violence was associated with more sexual partners leaving sexual networks. These associations were marginally significant. No post-relocation changes in place characteristics were significantly associated with overall sexual network stability. Neighborhood social context may influence sexual network turnover. To increase understanding of the social–ecological determinants of HIV/STIs, a new line of research should investigate the combined influence of neighborhood conditions and sexual network dynamics on HIV/STI transmission over time.",
keywords = "HIV/STIs, Longitudinal analysis, Neighborhoods, Sexual networks",
author = "Sabriya Linton and Cooper, {Hannah L.F.} and Ruiyan Luo and Conny Karnes and Kristen Renneker and Haley, {Danielle F.} and Dauria, {Emily F.} and Josalin Hunter-Jones and Zev Ross and Wingood, {Gina M.} and Adimora, {Adaora A.} and Loida Bonney and Richard Rothenberg",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10508-015-0687-x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "925--936",
journal = "Archives of Sexual Behavior",
issn = "0004-0002",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changing Places and Partners

T2 - Associations of Neighborhood Conditions With Sexual Network Turnover Among African American Adults Relocated From Public Housing

AU - Linton, Sabriya

AU - Cooper, Hannah L.F.

AU - Luo, Ruiyan

AU - Karnes, Conny

AU - Renneker, Kristen

AU - Haley, Danielle F.

AU - Dauria, Emily F.

AU - Hunter-Jones, Josalin

AU - Ross, Zev

AU - Wingood, Gina M.

AU - Adimora, Adaora A.

AU - Bonney, Loida

AU - Rothenberg, Richard

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Neighborhood conditions and sexual network turnover have been associated with the acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, few studies investigate the influence of neighborhood conditions on sexual network turnover. This longitudinal study used data collected across 7 visits from a predominantly substance-misusing cohort of 172 African American adults relocated from public housing in Atlanta, Georgia, to determine whether post-relocation changes in exposure to neighborhood conditions influence sexual network stability, the number of new partners joining sexual networks, and the number of partners leaving sexual networks over time. At each visit, participant and sexual network characteristics were captured via survey, and administrative data were analyzed to describe the census tracts where participants lived. Multilevel models were used to longitudinally assess the relationships of tract-level characteristics to sexual network dynamics over time. On average, participants relocated to neighborhoods that were less economically deprived and violent, and had lower alcohol outlet densities. Post-relocation reductions in exposure to alcohol outlet density were associated with fewer new partners joining sexual networks. Reduced perceived community violence was associated with more sexual partners leaving sexual networks. These associations were marginally significant. No post-relocation changes in place characteristics were significantly associated with overall sexual network stability. Neighborhood social context may influence sexual network turnover. To increase understanding of the social–ecological determinants of HIV/STIs, a new line of research should investigate the combined influence of neighborhood conditions and sexual network dynamics on HIV/STI transmission over time.

AB - Neighborhood conditions and sexual network turnover have been associated with the acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, few studies investigate the influence of neighborhood conditions on sexual network turnover. This longitudinal study used data collected across 7 visits from a predominantly substance-misusing cohort of 172 African American adults relocated from public housing in Atlanta, Georgia, to determine whether post-relocation changes in exposure to neighborhood conditions influence sexual network stability, the number of new partners joining sexual networks, and the number of partners leaving sexual networks over time. At each visit, participant and sexual network characteristics were captured via survey, and administrative data were analyzed to describe the census tracts where participants lived. Multilevel models were used to longitudinally assess the relationships of tract-level characteristics to sexual network dynamics over time. On average, participants relocated to neighborhoods that were less economically deprived and violent, and had lower alcohol outlet densities. Post-relocation reductions in exposure to alcohol outlet density were associated with fewer new partners joining sexual networks. Reduced perceived community violence was associated with more sexual partners leaving sexual networks. These associations were marginally significant. No post-relocation changes in place characteristics were significantly associated with overall sexual network stability. Neighborhood social context may influence sexual network turnover. To increase understanding of the social–ecological determinants of HIV/STIs, a new line of research should investigate the combined influence of neighborhood conditions and sexual network dynamics on HIV/STI transmission over time.

KW - HIV/STIs

KW - Longitudinal analysis

KW - Neighborhoods

KW - Sexual networks

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959324839&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959324839&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10508-015-0687-x

DO - 10.1007/s10508-015-0687-x

M3 - Article

C2 - 26927277

AN - SCOPUS:84959324839

VL - 46

SP - 925

EP - 936

JO - Archives of Sexual Behavior

JF - Archives of Sexual Behavior

SN - 0004-0002

IS - 4

ER -