Changing antibiotic resistance patterns for Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infections

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Beta-lactam antibiotics such as cefazolin are first-line agents for preoperative prophylaxis, whereas clindamycin is often administered to patients with a reported penicillin allergy. 1 Recent studies have reported increased resistance to clindamycin in Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolates from both pediatric and adult populations, and these changes may have implications for surgical site infection (SSI) prophylaxis and empirical management. 2 , 3 Antibiotic resistance trends of SA isolates recovered from SSIs in adults in the United States have not been recently described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInfection control and hospital epidemiology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Surgical Wound Infection
Clindamycin
Microbial Drug Resistance
Staphylococcus aureus
Cefazolin
beta-Lactams
Penicillins
Hypersensitivity
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Changing antibiotic resistance patterns for Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infections",
abstract = "Beta-lactam antibiotics such as cefazolin are first-line agents for preoperative prophylaxis, whereas clindamycin is often administered to patients with a reported penicillin allergy. 1 Recent studies have reported increased resistance to clindamycin in Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolates from both pediatric and adult populations, and these changes may have implications for surgical site infection (SSI) prophylaxis and empirical management. 2 , 3 Antibiotic resistance trends of SA isolates recovered from SSIs in adults in the United States have not been recently described.",
author = "Khamash, {Dina F.} and Aaron Milstone and Carroll, {Karen C} and Avinash Gadala and Eili Klein and Lisa Maragakis and Sara Cosgrove and Fabre, {Maria Valeria}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1017/ice.2019.4",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology",
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publisher = "University of Chicago Press",

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AU - Khamash, Dina F.

AU - Milstone, Aaron

AU - Carroll, Karen C

AU - Gadala, Avinash

AU - Klein, Eili

AU - Maragakis, Lisa

AU - Cosgrove, Sara

AU - Fabre, Maria Valeria

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

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AB - Beta-lactam antibiotics such as cefazolin are first-line agents for preoperative prophylaxis, whereas clindamycin is often administered to patients with a reported penicillin allergy. 1 Recent studies have reported increased resistance to clindamycin in Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolates from both pediatric and adult populations, and these changes may have implications for surgical site infection (SSI) prophylaxis and empirical management. 2 , 3 Antibiotic resistance trends of SA isolates recovered from SSIs in adults in the United States have not been recently described.

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