Changes in the prevalence of non-medical prescription drug use and drug use disorders in the United States: 1991-1992 and 2001-2002

Carlos Blanco, Donald Alderson, Elizabeth Leigh Ogburn, Bridget F. Grant, Edward V. Nunes, Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, Deborah S. Hasin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine changes in the prevalence of non-medical prescription drug use and DSM-IV non-medical prescription abuse and dependence in the United States between 1991-1992 and 2001-2002. Method: Comparison of the prevalence of past-year non-medical prescription drug use and drug use disorders in the total sample and among lifetime non-medical users in two large national surveys conducted 10 years apart. Results: From 1991-1992 to 2001-2002, the prevalence of DSM-IV non-medical prescription drug use increased by 53%, from 1.5% to 2.3% (p <0.001), and the prevalence of drug use disorders increased by 67% from 0.3% to 0.5% (p <0.001). The conditional prevalence of a disorder among users increased numerically from 19.9% to 23.6%, but this increase was not statistically significant (p = 0.15). Conclusions: There have been substantial increases in the prevalence of prescription drug non-medical use and prescription drug use disorders in the United States. Given the clinical utility of prescription drugs, urgent action is needed to find approaches that balance the need for access to these medications among those who need them, against their potential for abuse and dependence in subgroups of vulnerable individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-260
Number of pages9
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume90
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prescription Drug Misuse
Prescription Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders
drug use
medication
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
abuse
drug
comparison of methods
Prescriptions

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • NESARC
  • Prescription drug abuse
  • Prevalence trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Changes in the prevalence of non-medical prescription drug use and drug use disorders in the United States : 1991-1992 and 2001-2002. / Blanco, Carlos; Alderson, Donald; Ogburn, Elizabeth Leigh; Grant, Bridget F.; Nunes, Edward V.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Hasin, Deborah S.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 90, No. 2-3, 08.10.2007, p. 252-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blanco, Carlos ; Alderson, Donald ; Ogburn, Elizabeth Leigh ; Grant, Bridget F. ; Nunes, Edward V. ; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L. ; Hasin, Deborah S. / Changes in the prevalence of non-medical prescription drug use and drug use disorders in the United States : 1991-1992 and 2001-2002. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2007 ; Vol. 90, No. 2-3. pp. 252-260.
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