Changes in pulmonary artery pressure affect survival differently in lung transplant recipients who have pulmonary hypertension or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Kathryn L. O'Keefe, Ahmet Kilic, Amy Pope-Harman, Don Hayes, Stephen Kirkby, Robert S.D. Higgins, Bryan A. Whitson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction can complicate lung transplant. Pulmonary artery pressures affect outcome are uncertain during wait list. We evaluated changes in wait list pulmonary artery pressures on survival after lung transplant. Materials and Methods: We queried the United Network for Organ Sharing/Standard Transplant Analysis and Research registry from 1987 to 2012 for all lung transplants. Recipients with unique pulmonary artery pressure measurements upon listing and transplant were included. Mean pulmonary artery pressure was rated as increased (increase > 5 mm Hg), decreased (decrease > 5 mm Hg), or unchanged (variation < 5 mm Hg). Results: There were 23 951 lung transplants and 1677 recipients were included. Diagnoses demonstrated significant changes in mean pulmonary artery pressure during the listing period (P ≤.0001). In recipients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, survival was poorer when mean pulmonary artery pressure was increased than decreased (P ≤.03). In recipients with primary pulmonary hypertension, survival was poorer when mean pulmonary artery pressure was decreased than increased (P ≤.02). Proportional hazards analysis showed that increases in mean pulmonary artery pressure independently affected survival (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.96). Conclusions: Although the mechanism is unknown, an increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with poorer survival after lung transplant. In contrast, patients with primary pulmonary hypertension with decreased mean pulmonary artery pressure have poorer survival after lung transplant. In patients with primary pulmonary hypertension, changes in pulmonary artery pressure may be a surrogate for a failing right ventricular function. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the change in pressure suggests an undetermined progressive process. Further study of right ventricular function is warranted to determine the effects of changes in pulmonary artery pressure on lung transplant recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-289
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental and Clinical Transplantation
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hemodynamics
  • Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
  • Outcomes
  • Pulmonary failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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