Changes in intramyocardial ST segment voltage and gas tensions with regional myocardial ischemia in the dog

S. F. Khuri, J. T. Flaherty, J. B. O'Riordan, B. Pitt, R. K. Brawley, J. S. Donahoo, V. L. Gott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of changes in myocardial carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions as indicators of regional myocardial ischemia and also to determine to what extent these changes can be related to changes in intramyocardial ST segment voltage. Changes in ST segment voltage recorded in unipolar epicardial electrodes proved to be a less sensitive indicator of underlying myocardial ischemia than were changes in ST segment voltage recorded in unipolar intramyocardial electrodes. In 9 dogs, regional ischemia was produced by placing a variable constrictor on the left circumlex coronary artery; circumflex flow was monitored. Myocardial carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions were measured using a mass spectrometer. Unipolar electrograms were recorded using a multicontact plunge electrode. With progressive degrees of proximal stenosis, ranging from a critical stenosis, which is associated with a decrease in mean flow of less than 15%, to a severe stenosis associated with an 80% decrease, ST voltage increased 21 mv and carbon dioxide tension increased 84 mm Hg, but oxygen tension decreased only 7 mm Hg. The study suggests that increases in intramyocardial ST segment voltage, an index of myocardial ischemia, are associated with parallel increases in myocardial carbon dioxide tension, each providing a more sensitive quantitative correlate of regional myocardial ischemia than do decreases in oxygen tension. The local accumulation of carbon dioxide may be an important pathophysiological mechanisms in myocardial ischemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-463
Number of pages9
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1975
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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