Changes in eyelid position accompanying vertical rectus muscle surgery and prevention of lower lid retraction with adjustable surgery

E. M. Pacheco, D. L. Guyton, M. X. Repka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Whether or not eyelid position changes are caused by vertical rectus muscle surgery is controversial and poorly understood. We reviewed pre- and postoperative photographs of patients who underwent recession or resection of one or more vertical rectus muscles in a 10-year period. A change in eyelid position occurred frequently with vertical rectus muscle surgery. With superior rectus recession, 91% of the patients developed upper lid retraction. With inferior rectus recession, 94% of patients developed lower lid retraction. With inferior rectus resection, every patient developed lower lid advancement with accompanying flattening. We describe an adjustable surgical technique to prevent lower lid retraction associated with inferior rectus recession. The technique involves a separate adjustable suspension of the lower eyelid retractors from the inferior rectus insertion at the time of strabismus surgery. The lid position can then be adjusted separately at the time of muscle adjustment. After an average 2 1/2 -month follow up, no statistically significant lid retraction could be measured in six patients who underwent the adjustable lid suspension, while statistically significant retraction (P < .01) developed in a group of nine patients who had inferior rectus recession alone. This technique did not limit the success of the strabismus surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-272
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus
Volume29
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Ophthalmology

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