Changes in endocrine pancreatic function produced by altered dietary protein intake in drinking alcoholics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effect of dietary protein intake on abnormal endocrine pancreatic function was studied in five male chronic alcoholic patients with a recent history of heavy alcohol and poor dietary intake. Pancreatic function was assessed by means of the pancreozymin-secretin stimulation test. Immediately on admission and throughout the study, the patients were given ethanol, 250 g/day in divided doses. Initial administration of a low protein (25 g) 1800 calorie diet resulted in no improvement in pancreatic function. Institution of a normal protein (100 g) 2600 calorie diet for 10 days led to a return to normal in the output of bicarbonate, amylase, lipase, and chymotrypsin. Readministration of the low protein diet for 10 days resulted in decreased output of amylase and chymotrypsin. The volumes of secretion and outputs of trypsin and protein remained unchanged throughout the study. This study shows that the transient dysfunction of the exocrine pancreas frequently observed in actively drinking chronic alcoholic patients is caused by deficient dietary protein intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-12
Number of pages6
JournalJohns Hopkins Medical Journal
Volume138
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1976

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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