Change in worksite smoking behavior following cancer risk feedback: A pilot study

Robert A. Schnoll, Hao Wang, Suzanne M. Miller, James S. Babb, Mark J. Cornfeld, Susan Higman Tofani, Teresa Hennigan-Peel, Andrew Balshem, Elyse Slater, Eric Ross, C. S. Boyd, Paul F. Engstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To pilot a worksite smoking intervention. Methods: Following baseline assessment, participants (N=6378) received cancer risk feedback; 2 annual evaluations were conducted. Results: Using all data, smoking dropped from 13.7% to 8.4% and 9.3%, and smoker's readiness to quit increased. Using complete data, smoking initially increased from 5.7% to 6.7%, but subsequently decreased to 5.3%; the increase in smoker's readiness to quit remained. Being male, younger, and with lower education and self-efficacy predicted smoking. Lower age and higher self-efficacy predicted readiness to quit smoking. Conclusions: These findings support a formal evaluation of a worksite smoking intervention using cancer risk feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-227
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume29
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Workplace
smoking
cancer
Smoking
Neoplasms
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
evaluation
Education
education

Keywords

  • Predictors
  • Tobacco use
  • Worksite intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

Schnoll, R. A., Wang, H., Miller, S. M., Babb, J. S., Cornfeld, M. J., Tofani, S. H., ... Engstrom, P. F. (2005). Change in worksite smoking behavior following cancer risk feedback: A pilot study. American Journal of Health Behavior, 29(3), 215-227.

Change in worksite smoking behavior following cancer risk feedback : A pilot study. / Schnoll, Robert A.; Wang, Hao; Miller, Suzanne M.; Babb, James S.; Cornfeld, Mark J.; Tofani, Susan Higman; Hennigan-Peel, Teresa; Balshem, Andrew; Slater, Elyse; Ross, Eric; Boyd, C. S.; Engstrom, Paul F.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 29, No. 3, 05.2005, p. 215-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schnoll, RA, Wang, H, Miller, SM, Babb, JS, Cornfeld, MJ, Tofani, SH, Hennigan-Peel, T, Balshem, A, Slater, E, Ross, E, Boyd, CS & Engstrom, PF 2005, 'Change in worksite smoking behavior following cancer risk feedback: A pilot study', American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 215-227.
Schnoll RA, Wang H, Miller SM, Babb JS, Cornfeld MJ, Tofani SH et al. Change in worksite smoking behavior following cancer risk feedback: A pilot study. American Journal of Health Behavior. 2005 May;29(3):215-227.
Schnoll, Robert A. ; Wang, Hao ; Miller, Suzanne M. ; Babb, James S. ; Cornfeld, Mark J. ; Tofani, Susan Higman ; Hennigan-Peel, Teresa ; Balshem, Andrew ; Slater, Elyse ; Ross, Eric ; Boyd, C. S. ; Engstrom, Paul F. / Change in worksite smoking behavior following cancer risk feedback : A pilot study. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2005 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 215-227.
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