Challenges to hypertension and diabetes management in rural Uganda: A qualitative study with patients, village health team members, and health care professionals 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services

Haeyoon Chang, Nicola L. Hawley, Robert Kalyesubula, Trishul Siddharthan, William Checkley, Felix Knauf, Tracy L. Rabin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of hypertension and diabetes are expected to increase in sub-Saharan Africa over the next decade. Some studies have documented that lifestyle factors and lack of awareness are directly influencing the control of these diseases. Yet, few studies have attempted to understand the barriers to control of these conditions in rural settings. The main objective of this study was to understand the challenges to hypertension and diabetes care in rural Uganda. Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 patients with hypertension and/or diabetes, 11 health care professionals (HCPs), and 12 community health workers (known as village health team members [VHTs]) in Nakaseke District, Uganda. Data were coded using NVivo software and analyzed using a thematic approach. Results: The results replicated several findings from other settings, and identified some previously undocumented challenges including patients' knowledge gaps regarding the preventable aspects of HTN and DM, patients' mistrust in the Ugandan health care system rather than in individual HCPs, and skepticism from both HCPs and patients regarding a potential role for VHTs in HTN and DM management. Conclusions: In order to improve hypertension and diabetes management in this setting, we recommend taking actions to help patients to understand NCDs as preventable, for HCPs and patients to advocate together for health system reform regarding medication accessibility, and for promoting education, screening, and monitoring activities to be conducted on a community level in collaboration with village health team members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number38
JournalInternational journal for equity in health
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2019

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Patient Care Team
Uganda
Health Services
Public Health
Hypertension
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Africa South of the Sahara
Life Style
Software
Interviews
Education

Keywords

  • Chronic diseases
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Qualitative
  • Rural health
  • Uganda
  • Village health team

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Challenges to hypertension and diabetes management in rural Uganda: A qualitative study with patients, village health team members, and health care professionals 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services",
abstract = "Background: The prevalence of hypertension and diabetes are expected to increase in sub-Saharan Africa over the next decade. Some studies have documented that lifestyle factors and lack of awareness are directly influencing the control of these diseases. Yet, few studies have attempted to understand the barriers to control of these conditions in rural settings. The main objective of this study was to understand the challenges to hypertension and diabetes care in rural Uganda. Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 patients with hypertension and/or diabetes, 11 health care professionals (HCPs), and 12 community health workers (known as village health team members [VHTs]) in Nakaseke District, Uganda. Data were coded using NVivo software and analyzed using a thematic approach. Results: The results replicated several findings from other settings, and identified some previously undocumented challenges including patients' knowledge gaps regarding the preventable aspects of HTN and DM, patients' mistrust in the Ugandan health care system rather than in individual HCPs, and skepticism from both HCPs and patients regarding a potential role for VHTs in HTN and DM management. Conclusions: In order to improve hypertension and diabetes management in this setting, we recommend taking actions to help patients to understand NCDs as preventable, for HCPs and patients to advocate together for health system reform regarding medication accessibility, and for promoting education, screening, and monitoring activities to be conducted on a community level in collaboration with village health team members.",
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