Challenges in image-guided therapy system design

Simon DiMaio, Tina Kapur, Kevin Cleary, Stephen Aylward, Peter Kazanzides, Kirby Vosburgh, Randy Ellis, James Duncan, Keyvan Farahani, Heinz Lemke, Terry Peters, William (Bill) Lorensen, David Gobbi, John Haller, Laurence (Larry) Clarke, Stephen Pizer, Russell Taylor, Robert Galloway, Gabor Fichtinger, Nobuhiko HataKimberly Lawson, Clare Tempany, Ron Kikinis, Ferenc Jolesz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

System development for image-guided therapy (IGT), or image-guided interventions (IGI), continues to be an area of active interest across academic and industry groups. This is an emerging field that is growing rapidly: major academic institutions and medical device manufacturers have produced IGT technologies that are in routine clinical use, dozens of high-impact publications are published in well regarded journals each year, and several small companies have successfully commercialized sophisticated IGT systems. In meetings between IGT investigators over the last two years, a consensus has emerged that several key areas must be addressed collaboratively by the community to reach the next level of impact and efficiency in IGT research and development to improve patient care. These meetings culminated in a two-day workshop that brought together several academic and industrial leaders in the field today. The goals of the workshop were to identify gaps in the engineering infrastructure available to IGT researchers, develop the role of research funding agencies and the recently established US-based National Center for Image Guided Therapy (NCIGT), and ultimately to facilitate the transfer of technology among research centers that are sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Workshop discussions spanned many of the current challenges in the development and deployment of new IGT systems. Key challenges were identified in a number of areas, including: validation standards; workflows, use-cases, and application requirements; component reusability; and device interface standards. This report elaborates on these key points and proposes research challenges that are to be addressed by a joint effort between academic, industry, and NIH participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S144-S151
JournalNeuroImage
Volume37
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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