Challenges and Opportunities of Nontraditional Approaches to Treating Bacterial Infections

Brian N. Tse, Amesh A. Adalja, Christopher Houchens, Joseph Larsen, Thomas Inglesby, Richard Hatchett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Due to increasing rates of antimicrobial-resistant infections and the current inadequacy of the antibiotic pipeline, there is increasing interest in nontraditional approaches to antibacterial therapies. We define "traditional" agents as small-molecule agents that directly target bacterial components to exert a bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect, and "nontraditional approaches" as antimicrobial therapeutics that work through other means (ie, not a small molecule and/or utilizes a nontraditional target). Due to their atypical features, such therapies may be less susceptible to the emergence of resistance than traditional antibiotics. They include approaches such as monoclonal antibodies, virulence disruptors, immunomodulators, phage therapies, microbiome-based therapies, antibiotic potentiators, and antisense approaches. This article discusses both the developmental and regulatory advantages and challenges associated with each of these technologies. By identifying existing regulatory and developmental gaps, we hope to provide a sense of where focusing resources may provide the greatest impact on successful product development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-500
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume65
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Bacterial Infections
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Microbiota
Immunologic Factors
Therapeutics
Microbial Drug Resistance
Virulence
Monoclonal Antibodies
Technology
Infection

Keywords

  • antibiotic resistance
  • antibodies
  • microbiome
  • nontraditional approaches
  • phage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Challenges and Opportunities of Nontraditional Approaches to Treating Bacterial Infections. / Tse, Brian N.; Adalja, Amesh A.; Houchens, Christopher; Larsen, Joseph; Inglesby, Thomas; Hatchett, Richard.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 65, No. 3, 01.08.2017, p. 495-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tse, Brian N. ; Adalja, Amesh A. ; Houchens, Christopher ; Larsen, Joseph ; Inglesby, Thomas ; Hatchett, Richard. / Challenges and Opportunities of Nontraditional Approaches to Treating Bacterial Infections. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 65, No. 3. pp. 495-500.
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