Cessation Strategies Young Adult Smokers Use After Participating in a Facebook Intervention

Johannes Thrul, Danielle E. Ramo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Young adults underutilize current evidence-based smoking cessation strategies; yet social media are widely used and accepted among this population. A better understanding of whether and how young adults try to quit smoking in the context of a social media smoking cessation intervention could inform future intervention improvements. Objectives: We examined frequency, strategies used, and predictors of self-initiated 24-hour quit attempts among young adults participating in a Facebook intervention. Methods: A total of 79 young adult smokers (mean age = 20.8; 20.3% female) were recruited on Facebook for a feasibility trial. Participants joined motivationally tailored private Facebook groups and received daily posts over 12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Results: In 12 months, 52 participants (65.5%) completed 215 quit attempts (mean = 4.1; median = 4; range 1-14); 75.4% of attempts were undertaken with the Facebook intervention alone, 17.7% used an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette), 7.4% used nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), and 3.7% used additional professional advice. Non-daily smokers, those who smoked fewer cigarettes, and those in an advanced stage of change at baseline were more likely to make a quit attempt. E-cigarette use to aide a quit attempt during the study period was associated with reporting a past year quit attempt at baseline. No baseline characteristics predicted NRT use. Conclusions: After participating in a Facebook smoking cessation intervention, young adults predominantly tried to quit without additional assistance. E-cigarettes are used more frequently as cessation aid than NRT. The use of evidence-based smoking cessation strategies should be improved in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 28 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

facebook
young adult
smoking
Young Adult
Smoking Cessation
Nicotine
nicotine
Social Media
social media
Tobacco Products
Population
evidence
Therapeutics
assistance
Smoking
electronics
Electronic Cigarettes
Group

Keywords

  • cessation
  • Facebook
  • Smoking
  • treatment and intervention
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cessation Strategies Young Adult Smokers Use After Participating in a Facebook Intervention. / Thrul, Johannes; Ramo, Danielle E.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 52, No. 2, 28.01.2017, p. 259-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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