Centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age in high-income countries

Felix C. van Urk, Taylor W. Brown, Rebecca Waller, Evan R Mayo-Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A large proportion of children younger than five years of age in high-income countries experience significant non-parental care. Centre-based day care services may influence the development of children and the economic situation of parents.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of centre-based day care without additional interventions (e.g. psychological or medical services, parent training) on the development and well-being of children and families in high-income countries (as defined by the World Bank 2011).

SEARCH METHODS: In April 2014, we searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) and eight other databases. We also searched two trials registers and the reference lists of relevant studies.

SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age. We excluded studies that involved co-interventions not directed toward children (e.g. parent programmes, home visits, teacher training). We included the following outcomes: child cognitive development (primary outcome), child psychosocial development, maternal and family outcomes and child long-term outcomes.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the single included study. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information.

MAIN RESULTS: We included in the review one trial, involving 120 families and 143 children. Risk of bias was high because of contamination between groups, as 63% of control group participants accessed day care services separate from those offered within the intervention. No evidence suggested that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened children's cognitive ability (Griffiths Mental Development Scale, standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.01 to 0.69, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or psychosocial development (parental report of abnormal development, risk ratio (RR) 1.21, 95% CI 0.25 to 5.78, 137 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). No other measures of child intellectual or psychosocial development were reported in the included study. Moreover, no evidence indicated that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened employment of parents, as measured by the number of mothers in full-time or part-time employment (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.48, 114 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) and maternal hours per week in paid employment (SMD 0.20, 95% -0.15 to 0.55, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or household income above £200 per week (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.29, 113 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). This study did not report on long-term outcomes for children (high-school completion or income).

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review includes one trial that provides inconclusive evidence as regards the effects of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age and their families in high-income countries. Robust guidance for parents, policymakers and other stakeholders on the effects of day care cannot currently be offered on the basis of evidence from randomised controlled trials. Some trials included co-interventions that are unlikely to be found in normal day care centres. Effectiveness studies of centre-based day care without these co-interventions are few, and the need for such studies is significant. Comparisons might include home visits or alternative day care arrangements that provide special attention to children from low-income families while exploring possible mechanisms of effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)CD010544
JournalThe Cochrane database of systematic reviews
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Child Day Care Centers
Child Development
Confidence Intervals
House Calls
Parents
Odds Ratio
Mothers
Home Care Services
Randomized Controlled Trials
Information Centers
Aptitude
Economic Development
United Nations
MEDLINE
Research Personnel
Databases
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age in high-income countries. / van Urk, Felix C.; Brown, Taylor W.; Waller, Rebecca; Mayo-Wilson, Evan R.

In: The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, Vol. 9, 2014, p. CD010544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van Urk, Felix C. ; Brown, Taylor W. ; Waller, Rebecca ; Mayo-Wilson, Evan R. / Centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age in high-income countries. In: The Cochrane database of systematic reviews. 2014 ; Vol. 9. pp. CD010544.
@article{388c76b1bd2a46d19a783c8e817b901a,
title = "Centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age in high-income countries",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: A large proportion of children younger than five years of age in high-income countries experience significant non-parental care. Centre-based day care services may influence the development of children and the economic situation of parents.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of centre-based day care without additional interventions (e.g. psychological or medical services, parent training) on the development and well-being of children and families in high-income countries (as defined by the World Bank 2011).SEARCH METHODS: In April 2014, we searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) and eight other databases. We also searched two trials registers and the reference lists of relevant studies.SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age. We excluded studies that involved co-interventions not directed toward children (e.g. parent programmes, home visits, teacher training). We included the following outcomes: child cognitive development (primary outcome), child psychosocial development, maternal and family outcomes and child long-term outcomes.DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the single included study. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information.MAIN RESULTS: We included in the review one trial, involving 120 families and 143 children. Risk of bias was high because of contamination between groups, as 63{\%} of control group participants accessed day care services separate from those offered within the intervention. No evidence suggested that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened children's cognitive ability (Griffiths Mental Development Scale, standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.34, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) -0.01 to 0.69, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or psychosocial development (parental report of abnormal development, risk ratio (RR) 1.21, 95{\%} CI 0.25 to 5.78, 137 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). No other measures of child intellectual or psychosocial development were reported in the included study. Moreover, no evidence indicated that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened employment of parents, as measured by the number of mothers in full-time or part-time employment (RR 1.12, 95{\%} CI 0.85 to 1.48, 114 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) and maternal hours per week in paid employment (SMD 0.20, 95{\%} -0.15 to 0.55, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or household income above £200 per week (RR 0.86, 95{\%} CI 0.57 to 1.29, 113 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). This study did not report on long-term outcomes for children (high-school completion or income).AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review includes one trial that provides inconclusive evidence as regards the effects of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age and their families in high-income countries. Robust guidance for parents, policymakers and other stakeholders on the effects of day care cannot currently be offered on the basis of evidence from randomised controlled trials. Some trials included co-interventions that are unlikely to be found in normal day care centres. Effectiveness studies of centre-based day care without these co-interventions are few, and the need for such studies is significant. Comparisons might include home visits or alternative day care arrangements that provide special attention to children from low-income families while exploring possible mechanisms of effect.",
author = "{van Urk}, {Felix C.} and Brown, {Taylor W.} and Rebecca Waller and Mayo-Wilson, {Evan R}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1002/14651858.CD010544.pub2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "CD010544",
journal = "Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews",
issn = "1361-6137",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age in high-income countries

AU - van Urk, Felix C.

AU - Brown, Taylor W.

AU - Waller, Rebecca

AU - Mayo-Wilson, Evan R

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - BACKGROUND: A large proportion of children younger than five years of age in high-income countries experience significant non-parental care. Centre-based day care services may influence the development of children and the economic situation of parents.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of centre-based day care without additional interventions (e.g. psychological or medical services, parent training) on the development and well-being of children and families in high-income countries (as defined by the World Bank 2011).SEARCH METHODS: In April 2014, we searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) and eight other databases. We also searched two trials registers and the reference lists of relevant studies.SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age. We excluded studies that involved co-interventions not directed toward children (e.g. parent programmes, home visits, teacher training). We included the following outcomes: child cognitive development (primary outcome), child psychosocial development, maternal and family outcomes and child long-term outcomes.DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the single included study. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information.MAIN RESULTS: We included in the review one trial, involving 120 families and 143 children. Risk of bias was high because of contamination between groups, as 63% of control group participants accessed day care services separate from those offered within the intervention. No evidence suggested that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened children's cognitive ability (Griffiths Mental Development Scale, standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.01 to 0.69, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or psychosocial development (parental report of abnormal development, risk ratio (RR) 1.21, 95% CI 0.25 to 5.78, 137 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). No other measures of child intellectual or psychosocial development were reported in the included study. Moreover, no evidence indicated that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened employment of parents, as measured by the number of mothers in full-time or part-time employment (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.48, 114 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) and maternal hours per week in paid employment (SMD 0.20, 95% -0.15 to 0.55, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or household income above £200 per week (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.29, 113 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). This study did not report on long-term outcomes for children (high-school completion or income).AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review includes one trial that provides inconclusive evidence as regards the effects of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age and their families in high-income countries. Robust guidance for parents, policymakers and other stakeholders on the effects of day care cannot currently be offered on the basis of evidence from randomised controlled trials. Some trials included co-interventions that are unlikely to be found in normal day care centres. Effectiveness studies of centre-based day care without these co-interventions are few, and the need for such studies is significant. Comparisons might include home visits or alternative day care arrangements that provide special attention to children from low-income families while exploring possible mechanisms of effect.

AB - BACKGROUND: A large proportion of children younger than five years of age in high-income countries experience significant non-parental care. Centre-based day care services may influence the development of children and the economic situation of parents.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of centre-based day care without additional interventions (e.g. psychological or medical services, parent training) on the development and well-being of children and families in high-income countries (as defined by the World Bank 2011).SEARCH METHODS: In April 2014, we searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) and eight other databases. We also searched two trials registers and the reference lists of relevant studies.SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age. We excluded studies that involved co-interventions not directed toward children (e.g. parent programmes, home visits, teacher training). We included the following outcomes: child cognitive development (primary outcome), child psychosocial development, maternal and family outcomes and child long-term outcomes.DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the single included study. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information.MAIN RESULTS: We included in the review one trial, involving 120 families and 143 children. Risk of bias was high because of contamination between groups, as 63% of control group participants accessed day care services separate from those offered within the intervention. No evidence suggested that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened children's cognitive ability (Griffiths Mental Development Scale, standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.01 to 0.69, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or psychosocial development (parental report of abnormal development, risk ratio (RR) 1.21, 95% CI 0.25 to 5.78, 137 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). No other measures of child intellectual or psychosocial development were reported in the included study. Moreover, no evidence indicated that centre-based day care, rather than no treatment (care at home), improved or worsened employment of parents, as measured by the number of mothers in full-time or part-time employment (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.48, 114 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) and maternal hours per week in paid employment (SMD 0.20, 95% -0.15 to 0.55, 127 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence) or household income above £200 per week (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.29, 113 participants, 1 study, very low-quality evidence). This study did not report on long-term outcomes for children (high-school completion or income).AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review includes one trial that provides inconclusive evidence as regards the effects of centre-based day care for children younger than five years of age and their families in high-income countries. Robust guidance for parents, policymakers and other stakeholders on the effects of day care cannot currently be offered on the basis of evidence from randomised controlled trials. Some trials included co-interventions that are unlikely to be found in normal day care centres. Effectiveness studies of centre-based day care without these co-interventions are few, and the need for such studies is significant. Comparisons might include home visits or alternative day care arrangements that provide special attention to children from low-income families while exploring possible mechanisms of effect.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942742390&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942742390&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/14651858.CD010544.pub2

DO - 10.1002/14651858.CD010544.pub2

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - CD010544

JO - Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

JF - Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

SN - 1361-6137

ER -