Central nodal necrosis and extracapsular neoplastic spread in cervical lymph nodes: MR imaging versus CT

D. M. Yousem, P. M. Som, D. B. Hackney, F. Schwaibold, R. A. Hendrix

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Computed tomographic (CT) scans and magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained in 24 patients with cervical lymphadenopathy were retrospectively and blindly evaluated by two readers for the presence of central nodal necrosis (CNN) and extracapsular nodal spread (ENS). The CT studies were all enhanced, and the MR images were obtained with short repetition time (TR)/echo time (TE), long TR/double echo, and enhanced short TR/TE fat- suppressed sequences. Each MR imaging sequence was interpreted separately and then collectively. Sixty lymph nodes were identified with CT. Sensitivity for CNN was 16%-67% with the unenhanced MR pulse sequences, 50% with enhanced sequences, and 83%-100% with CT. The most accurate reading of MR images for CNN was with the unenhanced T1-weighted and T2-weighted images (86%-87%); the accuracy of CT was 91%-96%. The accuracy of MR imaging for detecting ENS was maximal with T1-weighted images (78%-90%). Gadolinium-enhanced, fat- suppressed images did not improve accuracy in evaluating CNN or ENS. CT is currently more accurate than unenhanced or enhanced MR imaging in detecting CNN or ENS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)753-759
Number of pages7
JournalRADIOLOGY
Volume182
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Head and neck neoplasms
  • Lymphatic system, CT
  • Lymphatic system, MR
  • Lymphatic system, neoplasms
  • MR, comparative studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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