Central line–associated bloodstream infection rate elevation: Attributable to National Healthcare Safety Network surveillance definition changes, ongoing opportunities for infection prevention, or both?

Andrew Corley, Maggie Cantara, Julia Gardner, Polly Trexler, Clare Rock, Lisa Maragakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Calendar year 2015 intensive care unit (ICU) central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) from 1 hospital were reviewed using 2014 CLABSI surveillance definitions to assess the relative impact of definition changes and infection control practices on CLABSI rates. Increased ICU primary CLABSI rates were found to be a result of both surveillance definition changes and infection control practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1030-1032
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Keywords

  • Central line–associated bloodstream infections
  • Hospital-acquired infections
  • Surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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