Centers for Disease Control light traps for monitoring Anopheles arabiensis human biting rates in an area with low vector density and high insecticide-treated bed net use

Christen M. Fornadel, Laura C. Norris, Douglas E. Norris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Human landing catches (HLCs) are currently the preferred method to determine vector human biting rates (HBRs), which are key determinants of entomologic inoculation rates and important measures for assessing the impact of vector control efforts. Although HLCs are the most direct means of establishing HBRs, they are labor-intensive, and their use is facing increasing ethical concerns. The relationship between Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps and HLC collections was evaluated in Macha, Zambia during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 rainy seasons. A CDC light trap captured on average 1.91 (95% confidence interval = 1.16-2.28) times as many An. arabiensis per night as an indoor HLC. Additionally, nets treated with deltamethrin did not affect the numbers of An. arabiensis collected. Our results suggest that in regions where use of vector control interventions is high and vector densities are low, CDC light traps can be used to monitor An. arabiensis HBRs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)838-842
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume83
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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