Cell-associated infectious HIV-1 viral load as a predictor of clinical progression and survival among HIV-1 infected injection drug users and homosexual men

Cynthia M. Lyles, Neil M H Graham, Jacquie Astemborski, David Vlahov, Joseph Bernard Margolick, Alfred J. Saah, Homayoon Farzadegan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cell-associated infectious HIV-1 viral load was measured using semi- quantitative microculture techniques to determine its predictive capability for progression to AIDS or survival among HIV-1 infected injecting drug users (IDU) and homosexual men (HM). The authors followed 296 IDU and 240 HM from February 1992 through September 1995 for: (i) death, (ii) AIDS, and (iii) AIDS or bacterial infection. At baseline, viral load was quantified using microculture techniques to determine infectious units per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (IUPM). Data were analyzed using standard statistical methods for survival analysis. Of the 536 total participants, 106 died (20%), and 98 of the 481 AIDS-free participants developed AIDS (20%). The relative hazard of AIDS for a viral load of ≥ 100 IUPM, relative to a negative culture (0 IUPM), was 6.73 (95% CI: 2.23-20.3) after adjusting for risk group, initial CD4+ count, and other covariates. The adjusted relative hazard of death for a viral load of ≥100 IUPM vs. 0 IUPM was 2.57 (95% CI: 0.97-6.80). Viral load predicted time to death within the <200 cells/μl CD4+ stratum. The predictive value of viral load on HIV-1 progression did not vary by risk group. These data show that cell associated infectious HIV- 1 viral load was significantly predictive of progression across risk groups for AIDS and death among those severely immune compromised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-108
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Epidemiology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Drug Users
Viral Load
HIV-1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Injections
Survival
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Survival Analysis
Sexual Minorities
Bacterial Infections
Blood Cells

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • HIV-1
  • Homosexuality
  • Injection drug use
  • Progression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Cell-associated infectious HIV-1 viral load as a predictor of clinical progression and survival among HIV-1 infected injection drug users and homosexual men. / Lyles, Cynthia M.; Graham, Neil M H; Astemborski, Jacquie; Vlahov, David; Margolick, Joseph Bernard; Saah, Alfred J.; Farzadegan, Homayoon.

In: European Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 1999, p. 99-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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