CE: Viral Hepatitis: New U.S. Screening Recommendations, Assessment Tools, and Treatments

Corinna Dan, Michelle Moses-Eisenstein, Ronald Valdiserri

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Over the past 15 years, the incidences of hepatitis A and B virus infection in the United States have declined significantly. By contrast, the incidence of hepatitis C virus infection, formerly stable or in decline, has increased by 75% since 2010. Suboptimal therapies of the past, insufficient provider awareness, and low screening rates have hampered efforts to improve diagnosis, management, and treatment of viral hepatitis. New screening recommendations, innovations in assessment and treatment, and an updated action plan from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) seem likely to lead to significant progress in the coming years. This article reviews the epidemiology, natural history, and diagnosis of viral hepatitis; discusses new screening recommendations, assessment tools, and treatments; and outlines the HHS action plan, focusing on the role of nurses in prevention and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-35
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Nursing
Volume115
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
Hepatitis
United States Dept. of Health and Human Services
Hepatitis A virus
Nurse's Role
Incidence
Natural History
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Health Services
Epidemiology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • chronic hepatitis
  • hepatitis A
  • hepatitis B
  • hepatitis C
  • hepatitis treatment
  • liver disease
  • viral hepatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

CE : Viral Hepatitis: New U.S. Screening Recommendations, Assessment Tools, and Treatments. / Dan, Corinna; Moses-Eisenstein, Michelle; Valdiserri, Ronald.

In: American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 115, No. 7, 08.07.2015, p. 26-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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