CD4 Lymphocyte Concentrations in Patients With Newly Identified HIV Infection Attending STD Clinics: Potential Impact on Publicly Funded Health Care Resources

Catherine M. Hutchinson, Cara Wilson, Cindy A. Reichart, Vincent C. Marsiglia, Jonathan Mark Zenilman, Edward W. Hook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since January 1990, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients attending two sexually transmitted disease clinics in Baltimore, Md, have been offered T-lymphocyte subset evaluations. From January through September, CD4+ lymphocyte concentrations were measured in 223 newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients; 50% had fewer than 500 CD4+ T cells and 12% had fewer than 200 CD4+ T cells per cubic millimeter. Most patients were asymptomatic, and, even among patients with fewer than 200 CD4+ T cells, 54% had no symptoms or signs suggestive of advanced HIV infection. Homosexually active men had significantly lower mean CD4+ lymphocyte concentrations than intravenous drug users. Given the substantial numbers of patients with CD4+ concentrations that qualified them for zidovudine therapy, we also assessed their mechanisms of paying for health care. Only 24% of HIV-infected patients had private insurance. Seventy-two percent of patients with fewer than 200 CD4+ T cells either had no insurance or relied on public assistance for health care. Thus, although 50% of asymptomatic individuals identified by routine voluntary HIV screening in an inner-city sexually transmitted disease clinic may benefit from therapy for their disease, 75% of those qualifying for presently recommended therapy either depend on publicly funded health care or have no means of payment for care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-256
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume266
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 10 1991

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Health Resources
Virus Diseases
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
HIV
Lymphocytes
Delivery of Health Care
T-Lymphocytes
Insurance
Public Assistance
Baltimore
Zidovudine
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
Drug Users
Signs and Symptoms
Therapeutics
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

CD4 Lymphocyte Concentrations in Patients With Newly Identified HIV Infection Attending STD Clinics : Potential Impact on Publicly Funded Health Care Resources. / Hutchinson, Catherine M.; Wilson, Cara; Reichart, Cindy A.; Marsiglia, Vincent C.; Zenilman, Jonathan Mark; Hook, Edward W.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 266, No. 2, 10.07.1991, p. 253-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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