Causes and trends in traumatic brain injury for united states adolescents

Anthony O. Asemota, Benjamin P. George, Steven M. Bowman, Adil H. Haider, Eric B. Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability among United States adolescents. The authors sought to determine causes and trends for TBI-related hospitalizations in the United States adolescent population (10-19 years). The authors identified common causes and trends of adolescent TBI, overall and within 2-year age categories, using hospitalization data from 2005 to 2009 in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The leading cause of adolescent TBI overall was motor vehicle occupant accidents (35%), which are also the leading cause in the 14-15, 16-17, and 18-19 year age groups. Falls were the cause of most TBI in the 10-11 year (23%) and 12-13 year (20%) age groups. For both unintentional and intentional mechanisms of injury, there was evidence of increasing hospitalizations with increasing age. From 2005 to 2009, the overall annual incidence of adolescent TBI hospitalizations decreased 21% from an estimated 75.5-59.3 per 100,000 (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-75
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2013

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Hospitalization
Age Groups
Motor Vehicles
Accidents
Traumatic Brain Injury
Inpatients
Cause of Death
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Population

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • head trauma
  • pediatric brain injury
  • TBI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Asemota, A. O., George, B. P., Bowman, S. M., Haider, A. H., & Schneider, E. B. (2013). Causes and trends in traumatic brain injury for united states adolescents. Journal of Neurotrauma, 30(2), 67-75. https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2012.2605

Causes and trends in traumatic brain injury for united states adolescents. / Asemota, Anthony O.; George, Benjamin P.; Bowman, Steven M.; Haider, Adil H.; Schneider, Eric B.

In: Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 30, No. 2, 15.01.2013, p. 67-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asemota, AO, George, BP, Bowman, SM, Haider, AH & Schneider, EB 2013, 'Causes and trends in traumatic brain injury for united states adolescents', Journal of Neurotrauma, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 67-75. https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2012.2605
Asemota AO, George BP, Bowman SM, Haider AH, Schneider EB. Causes and trends in traumatic brain injury for united states adolescents. Journal of Neurotrauma. 2013 Jan 15;30(2):67-75. https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2012.2605
Asemota, Anthony O. ; George, Benjamin P. ; Bowman, Steven M. ; Haider, Adil H. ; Schneider, Eric B. / Causes and trends in traumatic brain injury for united states adolescents. In: Journal of Neurotrauma. 2013 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 67-75.
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