Catheter-Directed Low-Dose Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Treatment of Right Atrial Thrombus Caused by a Central Venous Catheter

Gabriela M. Orgeron, Jessica L. Pollard, Paria Pourmalek, Peter J. Sloane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Catheter-related atrial thrombosis is a potentially deadly complication of central venous catheters. Options for treatment include surgical thrombectomy, systemic anticoagulation, and systemic thrombolysis, but the optimal method of treatment remains unknown. We describe a 48-year-old woman with a large right atrial thrombus who was successfully treated with localized recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). She was treated with an 18-hour infusion of localized low-dose tPA administered through her central venous catheter. The dimensions of the thrombus decreased from 30 × 16 × 22 mm to 10 × 8 × 5 mm after treatment with tPA, corresponding to an associated 96% reduction in thrombus volume. No major bleeding complications were observed. Catheter-directed thrombolysis provides the theoretical advantage of a decreased rate of major bleeding by reducing the exposure to and duration of high-dose systemic thrombolytic therapy. To our knowledge, this is the second case report describing the use of this novel therapy. Although no guidelines for the treatment of atrial thrombosis or consensus on the optimal regimen for catheter-directed thrombolysis (and intensity of concomitant anticoagulation) exist, we believe that this intervention may be a well-tolerated alternative to systemic thrombolysis and surgery in certain patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e153-e158
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume35
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2015

Keywords

  • atrial thrombus
  • catheter-directed
  • tissue plasminogen activator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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