Catastrophic health expenditure and rural household impoverishment in China: What role does the new cooperative health insurance scheme play?

Ye Li, Qunhong Wu, Chaojie Liu, Zheng Kang, Xin Xie, Hui Yin, Mingli Jiao, Guoxiang Liu, Yanhua Hao, Ning Ning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether the New Cooperative Medical Insurance Scheme (NCMS) is associated with decreased levels of catastrophic health expenditure and reduced impoverishment due to medical expenses in rural households of China. Methods: An analysis of a national representative sample of 38,945 rural households (129,635 people) from the 2008 National Health Service Survey was performed. Logistic regression models used binary indicator of catastrophic health expenditure as dependent variable, with household consumption, demographic characteristics, health insurance schemes, and chronic illness as independent variables. Results: Higher percentage of households experiencing catastrophic health expenditure and medical impoverishment correlates to increased health care need. While the higher socio-economic status households had similar levels of catastrophic health expenditure as compared with the lowest. Households covered by the NCMS had similar levels of catastrophic health expenditure and medical impoverishment as those without health insurance. Conclusion: Despite over 95% of coverage, the NCMS has failed to prevent catastrophic health expenditure and medical impoverishment. An upgrade of benefit packages is needed, and effective cost control mechanisms on the provider side needs to be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere93253
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 8 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Health insurance
health care costs
health insurance
Health Insurance
Health Expenditures
cooperatives
households
China
Health
Insurance
Health Status
health services
Logistic Models
Economics
Cost Control
sociodemographic characteristics
National Health Programs
socioeconomic status
Health Surveys
chronic diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Catastrophic health expenditure and rural household impoverishment in China : What role does the new cooperative health insurance scheme play? / Li, Ye; Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Kang, Zheng; Xie, Xin; Yin, Hui; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Guoxiang; Hao, Yanhua; Ning, Ning.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 4, e93253, 08.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Ye ; Wu, Qunhong ; Liu, Chaojie ; Kang, Zheng ; Xie, Xin ; Yin, Hui ; Jiao, Mingli ; Liu, Guoxiang ; Hao, Yanhua ; Ning, Ning. / Catastrophic health expenditure and rural household impoverishment in China : What role does the new cooperative health insurance scheme play?. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 4.
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AU - Xie, Xin

AU - Yin, Hui

AU - Jiao, Mingli

AU - Liu, Guoxiang

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