Case Report: Improving Verbal Retrieval Deficits With High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Targeting the Pre-Supplementary Motor Area in a Patient With Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

Hsueh Sheng Chiang, Scott Shakal, Sven Vanneste, Michael Kraut, John Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We report a patient who has cognitive sequalae including verbal retrieval deficits after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The cortico-caudate-thalamic circuit involving the pre-Supplementary Motor Area (pre-SMA) has been proposed to underlie verbal retrieval functions. We hypothesized that High Definition-transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (HD-tDCS) targeting the pre-SMA would selectively modulate this circuit to remediate verbal retrieval deficits. After the patient underwent 10 sessions of 20 min of 1 mA HD-tDCS targeting the pre-SMA, we documented significant improvements for verbal fluency and naming, and for working memory and executive function tasks that involve the frontal lobes. The effects persisted for up to 14 weeks after completion of HD-tDCS treatment. We also demonstrated normalization of the event-related potentials suggesting modulation of the underlying neural circuit. Our study implicates that region-specific non-invasive brain stimulation, such as HD-tDCS, serves as a potential individualized therapeutic tool to treat cognitive deficits by inducing longer-lasting neuroplasticity even in the chronic phase of TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number678518
JournalFrontiers in Neurology
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 16 2021

Keywords

  • EEG
  • HD-tDCS
  • TBI
  • case report
  • tDCS
  • verbal fluency
  • verbal retrieval
  • word finding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Case Report: Improving Verbal Retrieval Deficits With High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Targeting the Pre-Supplementary Motor Area in a Patient With Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this