Carotenoid intakes, assessed by food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs), are associated with serum carotenoid concentrations in the Jackson Heart Study: Validation of the Jackson Heart Study Delta NIRI Adult FFQs

Sameera A. Talegawkar, Elizabeth J. Johnson, Teresa C. Carithers, Herman A. Taylor, Margaret L. Bogle, Katherine L. Tucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Intake and status of carotenoids have been associated with chronic disease. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between carotenoid intakes as measured by two regional food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and their corresponding measures in serum, and to report on dietary food sources of carotenoids in Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data for 402 African American men and women participating in the Diet and Physical Activity Sub-Study (DPASS) of the JHS. Results: Mean serum carotenoid concentrations and intakes in this population were comparable to those reported for the general US population. After adjustment for covariates, correlations between serum and dietary measures of each carotenoid, for the average of the recalls (deattenuated), the short FFQ and the long FFQ, respectively, were: 0.37, 0.35 and 0.21 for β-carotene; 0.35, 0.26 and 0.28 for total (diet plus supplements) β-carotene; 0.25, 0.17 and 0.20 for dietary β-carotene; 0.42, 0.34 and 0.26 for β-cryptoxanthin; 0.33, 0.15 and 0.17 for lutein plus zeaxanthin; and 0.37, 0.19 and 0.14 for lycopene. Major dietary sources of β-carotene were orange vegetables; of β-carotene and lutein plus zeaxanthin, mustard, turnip and collard greens; of β-cryptoxanthin, orange juice; and of lycopene, tomato juice. Conclusions: On average, carotenoid intakes and serum concentrations are not lower in this southern African American population than the general US population. The two regional FFQs developed for a southern US population and used as dietary assessment tools in the JHS appear to provide reasonably valid information for most of these carotenoids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)989-997
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Validation Studies
food frequency questionnaires
Carotenoids
carotenoids
Eating
carotenes
heart
Food
Serum
traditional foods
zeaxanthin
African Americans
lycopene
lutein
turnip greens
Lutein
mustard greens
collard greens
Population
tomato juice

Keywords

  • Adult
  • African American
  • Carotenoids
  • Food frequency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Food Science

Cite this

Carotenoid intakes, assessed by food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs), are associated with serum carotenoid concentrations in the Jackson Heart Study : Validation of the Jackson Heart Study Delta NIRI Adult FFQs. / Talegawkar, Sameera A.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Carithers, Teresa C.; Taylor, Herman A.; Bogle, Margaret L.; Tucker, Katherine L.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 11, No. 10, 10.2008, p. 989-997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talegawkar, Sameera A. ; Johnson, Elizabeth J. ; Carithers, Teresa C. ; Taylor, Herman A. ; Bogle, Margaret L. ; Tucker, Katherine L. / Carotenoid intakes, assessed by food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs), are associated with serum carotenoid concentrations in the Jackson Heart Study : Validation of the Jackson Heart Study Delta NIRI Adult FFQs. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2008 ; Vol. 11, No. 10. pp. 989-997.
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abstract = "Objectives: Intake and status of carotenoids have been associated with chronic disease. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between carotenoid intakes as measured by two regional food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and their corresponding measures in serum, and to report on dietary food sources of carotenoids in Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data for 402 African American men and women participating in the Diet and Physical Activity Sub-Study (DPASS) of the JHS. Results: Mean serum carotenoid concentrations and intakes in this population were comparable to those reported for the general US population. After adjustment for covariates, correlations between serum and dietary measures of each carotenoid, for the average of the recalls (deattenuated), the short FFQ and the long FFQ, respectively, were: 0.37, 0.35 and 0.21 for β-carotene; 0.35, 0.26 and 0.28 for total (diet plus supplements) β-carotene; 0.25, 0.17 and 0.20 for dietary β-carotene; 0.42, 0.34 and 0.26 for β-cryptoxanthin; 0.33, 0.15 and 0.17 for lutein plus zeaxanthin; and 0.37, 0.19 and 0.14 for lycopene. Major dietary sources of β-carotene were orange vegetables; of β-carotene and lutein plus zeaxanthin, mustard, turnip and collard greens; of β-cryptoxanthin, orange juice; and of lycopene, tomato juice. Conclusions: On average, carotenoid intakes and serum concentrations are not lower in this southern African American population than the general US population. The two regional FFQs developed for a southern US population and used as dietary assessment tools in the JHS appear to provide reasonably valid information for most of these carotenoids.",
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T1 - Carotenoid intakes, assessed by food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs), are associated with serum carotenoid concentrations in the Jackson Heart Study

T2 - Validation of the Jackson Heart Study Delta NIRI Adult FFQs

AU - Talegawkar, Sameera A.

AU - Johnson, Elizabeth J.

AU - Carithers, Teresa C.

AU - Taylor, Herman A.

AU - Bogle, Margaret L.

AU - Tucker, Katherine L.

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N2 - Objectives: Intake and status of carotenoids have been associated with chronic disease. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between carotenoid intakes as measured by two regional food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and their corresponding measures in serum, and to report on dietary food sources of carotenoids in Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data for 402 African American men and women participating in the Diet and Physical Activity Sub-Study (DPASS) of the JHS. Results: Mean serum carotenoid concentrations and intakes in this population were comparable to those reported for the general US population. After adjustment for covariates, correlations between serum and dietary measures of each carotenoid, for the average of the recalls (deattenuated), the short FFQ and the long FFQ, respectively, were: 0.37, 0.35 and 0.21 for β-carotene; 0.35, 0.26 and 0.28 for total (diet plus supplements) β-carotene; 0.25, 0.17 and 0.20 for dietary β-carotene; 0.42, 0.34 and 0.26 for β-cryptoxanthin; 0.33, 0.15 and 0.17 for lutein plus zeaxanthin; and 0.37, 0.19 and 0.14 for lycopene. Major dietary sources of β-carotene were orange vegetables; of β-carotene and lutein plus zeaxanthin, mustard, turnip and collard greens; of β-cryptoxanthin, orange juice; and of lycopene, tomato juice. Conclusions: On average, carotenoid intakes and serum concentrations are not lower in this southern African American population than the general US population. The two regional FFQs developed for a southern US population and used as dietary assessment tools in the JHS appear to provide reasonably valid information for most of these carotenoids.

AB - Objectives: Intake and status of carotenoids have been associated with chronic disease. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between carotenoid intakes as measured by two regional food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and their corresponding measures in serum, and to report on dietary food sources of carotenoids in Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data for 402 African American men and women participating in the Diet and Physical Activity Sub-Study (DPASS) of the JHS. Results: Mean serum carotenoid concentrations and intakes in this population were comparable to those reported for the general US population. After adjustment for covariates, correlations between serum and dietary measures of each carotenoid, for the average of the recalls (deattenuated), the short FFQ and the long FFQ, respectively, were: 0.37, 0.35 and 0.21 for β-carotene; 0.35, 0.26 and 0.28 for total (diet plus supplements) β-carotene; 0.25, 0.17 and 0.20 for dietary β-carotene; 0.42, 0.34 and 0.26 for β-cryptoxanthin; 0.33, 0.15 and 0.17 for lutein plus zeaxanthin; and 0.37, 0.19 and 0.14 for lycopene. Major dietary sources of β-carotene were orange vegetables; of β-carotene and lutein plus zeaxanthin, mustard, turnip and collard greens; of β-cryptoxanthin, orange juice; and of lycopene, tomato juice. Conclusions: On average, carotenoid intakes and serum concentrations are not lower in this southern African American population than the general US population. The two regional FFQs developed for a southern US population and used as dietary assessment tools in the JHS appear to provide reasonably valid information for most of these carotenoids.

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