Caregiving and chronic care: The guided care program for families and friends

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. The Guided Care Program for Families and Friends (GCPFF) is one component of "Guided Care" (GC), a model of primary care for chronically ill older adults that is facilitated by a registered nurse who has completed a supplemental educational curriculum. Methods. The GCPFF melds support for family caregivers with the delivery of coordinated and comprehensive chronic care and seeks to improve the health and well-being of both patients and their family caregivers. The GCPFF encompasses (a) an initial meeting between the nurse and the patient's primary caregiver, (b) education and referral to community resources, (c) ongoing "coaching," (d) a six-session group Caregiver Workshop, and (e) monthly Support Group meetings, all facilitated by the patient's GC nurse. Results. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of GC is underway in 14 primary care physician teams. Of 904 consented patients, 450 (49.8%) identifi ed a primary caregiver; 308 caregivers met eligibility criteria, consented to participate, and completed a baseline interview. At 6-month follow-up, intervention group caregivers ' mean Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD) and Caregiver Strain Index (CSI) scores were respectively 0.97 points ( p =.14) and 1.14 points ( p =.06) lower than control group caregivers '. Among caregivers who provided more than 14 hours of weekly assistance at baseline, intervention group caregivers ' mean CESD and CSI scores were respectively 1.23 points ( p =.20) and 1.83 points ( p =.04) lower than control group caregivers '. Conclusions. The GCPFF may benefi t family caregivers of chronically ill older adults. Outcomes will continue to be monitored at 18-months follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-791
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume64
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

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Caregivers
Nurses
Epidemiologic Studies
Chronic Disease
Depression
Education
Control Groups
Group Processes
Self-Help Groups
Primary Care Physicians
Curriculum
Primary Health Care
Patient Care
Referral and Consultation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Interviews

Keywords

  • Caregiving
  • Chronic disease
  • Nursing
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{3c85d38ceb244ae683fe17537416d6f3,
title = "Caregiving and chronic care: The guided care program for families and friends",
abstract = "Background. The Guided Care Program for Families and Friends (GCPFF) is one component of {"}Guided Care{"} (GC), a model of primary care for chronically ill older adults that is facilitated by a registered nurse who has completed a supplemental educational curriculum. Methods. The GCPFF melds support for family caregivers with the delivery of coordinated and comprehensive chronic care and seeks to improve the health and well-being of both patients and their family caregivers. The GCPFF encompasses (a) an initial meeting between the nurse and the patient's primary caregiver, (b) education and referral to community resources, (c) ongoing {"}coaching,{"} (d) a six-session group Caregiver Workshop, and (e) monthly Support Group meetings, all facilitated by the patient's GC nurse. Results. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of GC is underway in 14 primary care physician teams. Of 904 consented patients, 450 (49.8{\%}) identifi ed a primary caregiver; 308 caregivers met eligibility criteria, consented to participate, and completed a baseline interview. At 6-month follow-up, intervention group caregivers ' mean Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD) and Caregiver Strain Index (CSI) scores were respectively 0.97 points ( p =.14) and 1.14 points ( p =.06) lower than control group caregivers '. Among caregivers who provided more than 14 hours of weekly assistance at baseline, intervention group caregivers ' mean CESD and CSI scores were respectively 1.23 points ( p =.20) and 1.83 points ( p =.04) lower than control group caregivers '. Conclusions. The GCPFF may benefi t family caregivers of chronically ill older adults. Outcomes will continue to be monitored at 18-months follow-up.",
keywords = "Caregiving, Chronic disease, Nursing, Primary care",
author = "Jennifer Wolff and Erin Rand-Giovannetti and Sara Palmer and Wegener, {Stephen T} and Lisa Reider and Katherine Frey and Scharfstein, {Daniel O} and Chad Boult",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1093/gerona/glp030",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
pages = "785--791",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "7",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Caregiving and chronic care

T2 - The guided care program for families and friends

AU - Wolff, Jennifer

AU - Rand-Giovannetti, Erin

AU - Palmer, Sara

AU - Wegener, Stephen T

AU - Reider, Lisa

AU - Frey, Katherine

AU - Scharfstein, Daniel O

AU - Boult, Chad

PY - 2009/7

Y1 - 2009/7

N2 - Background. The Guided Care Program for Families and Friends (GCPFF) is one component of "Guided Care" (GC), a model of primary care for chronically ill older adults that is facilitated by a registered nurse who has completed a supplemental educational curriculum. Methods. The GCPFF melds support for family caregivers with the delivery of coordinated and comprehensive chronic care and seeks to improve the health and well-being of both patients and their family caregivers. The GCPFF encompasses (a) an initial meeting between the nurse and the patient's primary caregiver, (b) education and referral to community resources, (c) ongoing "coaching," (d) a six-session group Caregiver Workshop, and (e) monthly Support Group meetings, all facilitated by the patient's GC nurse. Results. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of GC is underway in 14 primary care physician teams. Of 904 consented patients, 450 (49.8%) identifi ed a primary caregiver; 308 caregivers met eligibility criteria, consented to participate, and completed a baseline interview. At 6-month follow-up, intervention group caregivers ' mean Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD) and Caregiver Strain Index (CSI) scores were respectively 0.97 points ( p =.14) and 1.14 points ( p =.06) lower than control group caregivers '. Among caregivers who provided more than 14 hours of weekly assistance at baseline, intervention group caregivers ' mean CESD and CSI scores were respectively 1.23 points ( p =.20) and 1.83 points ( p =.04) lower than control group caregivers '. Conclusions. The GCPFF may benefi t family caregivers of chronically ill older adults. Outcomes will continue to be monitored at 18-months follow-up.

AB - Background. The Guided Care Program for Families and Friends (GCPFF) is one component of "Guided Care" (GC), a model of primary care for chronically ill older adults that is facilitated by a registered nurse who has completed a supplemental educational curriculum. Methods. The GCPFF melds support for family caregivers with the delivery of coordinated and comprehensive chronic care and seeks to improve the health and well-being of both patients and their family caregivers. The GCPFF encompasses (a) an initial meeting between the nurse and the patient's primary caregiver, (b) education and referral to community resources, (c) ongoing "coaching," (d) a six-session group Caregiver Workshop, and (e) monthly Support Group meetings, all facilitated by the patient's GC nurse. Results. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of GC is underway in 14 primary care physician teams. Of 904 consented patients, 450 (49.8%) identifi ed a primary caregiver; 308 caregivers met eligibility criteria, consented to participate, and completed a baseline interview. At 6-month follow-up, intervention group caregivers ' mean Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD) and Caregiver Strain Index (CSI) scores were respectively 0.97 points ( p =.14) and 1.14 points ( p =.06) lower than control group caregivers '. Among caregivers who provided more than 14 hours of weekly assistance at baseline, intervention group caregivers ' mean CESD and CSI scores were respectively 1.23 points ( p =.20) and 1.83 points ( p =.04) lower than control group caregivers '. Conclusions. The GCPFF may benefi t family caregivers of chronically ill older adults. Outcomes will continue to be monitored at 18-months follow-up.

KW - Caregiving

KW - Chronic disease

KW - Nursing

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