Caregiver-Reported Asthma Control Predicts Future Visits, Independent of Guideline-Based Control Measures

Suzanne R. Kochis, Torie Grant, Wanda Phipatanakul, Matthew Perzanowski, Susan Balcer-Whaley, Jean Curtin-Brosnan, Michelle Newman, Amparito Cunningham, Mary E. Bollinger, Elizabeth C. Matsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: It is unknown whether caregiver perception of a child's asthma control, independent of guideline-based asthma control assessment, is a predictor of future acute visits. Objective: To determine whether caregiver-reported asthma control is an indicator of future risk of acute visit. Methods: Two study populations of low-income, minority 5- to 17-year-old children with persistent asthma were included. Questionnaires administered at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months captured symptoms, short-acting β-agonist use, acute visits in the previous 3 months, and caregiver-reported asthma control. Well-controlled, not well-controlled, and very poorly controlled asthma were defined using National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guideline-based assessment. Relationships between caregiver-reported control and acute visits in the subsequent 3 months were examined. Results: At baseline, both populations were predominantly black/African American (91% and 79%) with public insurance (85% and 88%) and very poorly controlled asthma (47% and 50%). In both populations, most caregivers reported that their child's asthma was well controlled (73% and 69%). In both populations, participants whose caregivers reported that their child had uncontrolled asthma had greater odds of having an acute visit in the following 3 months as compared with participants whose caregivers reported that their child's asthma was well controlled, independent of guideline-based control, age, sex, race, controller medication, insurance, and atopy (odds ratio [95% CI], 2.4 [1.4-4.2] and 1.6 [1.1-2.4]). Conclusions: Among predominantly low-income minority children with asthma, caregiver-reported asthma control may provide information about the risk of future acute visit for asthma that is complementary to guideline-based control assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1516-1521.e1
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Keywords

  • Asthma control
  • Childhood asthma
  • NAEPP guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Caregiver-Reported Asthma Control Predicts Future Visits, Independent of Guideline-Based Control Measures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this