Care management in Germany and the U.S. An expanded laboratory

Patricia M. Pittman, Sharon B. Arnold, Sophia Schlette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Germany and the U.S. share a keen interest in exploring the potential of care management programs for the chronically ill. Despite obvious health system differences, in both countries there has been a proliferation of disease management models, initiated by a variety of actors, paid for in different ways, targeting different types of population groups, and encompassing a broad menu of interventions and services. Comparison of three case studies from the U.S. and four from Germany reveals greater differences among models within countries than between them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-18
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Care Financing Review
Volume27
Issue number1
StatePublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Germany
chronically ill
population group
Disease Management
Population Groups
management
proliferation
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Disease
Health
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Pittman, P. M., Arnold, S. B., & Schlette, S. (2005). Care management in Germany and the U.S. An expanded laboratory. Health Care Financing Review, 27(1), 9-18.

Care management in Germany and the U.S. An expanded laboratory. / Pittman, Patricia M.; Arnold, Sharon B.; Schlette, Sophia.

In: Health Care Financing Review, Vol. 27, No. 1, 09.2005, p. 9-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pittman, PM, Arnold, SB & Schlette, S 2005, 'Care management in Germany and the U.S. An expanded laboratory', Health Care Financing Review, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 9-18.
Pittman, Patricia M. ; Arnold, Sharon B. ; Schlette, Sophia. / Care management in Germany and the U.S. An expanded laboratory. In: Health Care Financing Review. 2005 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 9-18.
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