Care coordination for CSHCN: Associations with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes

Renee M. Turchi, Zekarias Berhane, Christina Bethell, Amber Pomponio, Richard Antonelli, Cynthia S Minkovitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between receiving adequate care coordination (CC) with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Eligible subjects were the 88% of families asked about experience with CC, service use, and communication. Respondents also reported on demographic characteristics, health status, family-provider relations, and family/child outcomes. Weighted, multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to assess independent associations of adequate CC with outcomes. RESULTS: Among families with children with special health care needs asked about CC, 68.2% reported receiving some type of CC help. Of these, 59.2% reported receiving adequate CC help, and 40.8% reported inadequate CC. Families that reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had increased odds of receiving family-centered care, experiencing partnerships with professionals, and satisfaction with services. They had decreased odds of having problems with referrals for specialty care, missing >6 school days because of illness (previous year), and visiting the emergency department more than twice in the previous 12 months (P <.001). Those who reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had decreased odds of the following: more than $500/y of out-of-pocket expenses, family financial burden, spending more than 4 hours/week coordinating care, and stopping/reducing work hours. CONCLUSIONS: Parental report of adequate CC was associated with favorable family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. Additional efforts are needed to discern which aspects of CC are most beneficial and for which subgroups of children with special health care needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume124
Issue numberSUPPL. 4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Delivery of Health Care
Logistic Models
Sick Leave
Health Expenditures
Health Status
Hospital Emergency Service
Referral and Consultation
Communication
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Care coordination
  • Children with special health care needs
  • Family-centered care
  • Medical home
  • National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Care coordination for CSHCN : Associations with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. / Turchi, Renee M.; Berhane, Zekarias; Bethell, Christina; Pomponio, Amber; Antonelli, Richard; Minkovitz, Cynthia S.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 124, No. SUPPL. 4, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turchi, Renee M. ; Berhane, Zekarias ; Bethell, Christina ; Pomponio, Amber ; Antonelli, Richard ; Minkovitz, Cynthia S. / Care coordination for CSHCN : Associations with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. In: Pediatrics. 2009 ; Vol. 124, No. SUPPL. 4.
@article{2efbb68422c9490b8c1d7a7dfa7e5c29,
title = "Care coordination for CSHCN: Associations with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between receiving adequate care coordination (CC) with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Eligible subjects were the 88{\%} of families asked about experience with CC, service use, and communication. Respondents also reported on demographic characteristics, health status, family-provider relations, and family/child outcomes. Weighted, multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to assess independent associations of adequate CC with outcomes. RESULTS: Among families with children with special health care needs asked about CC, 68.2{\%} reported receiving some type of CC help. Of these, 59.2{\%} reported receiving adequate CC help, and 40.8{\%} reported inadequate CC. Families that reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had increased odds of receiving family-centered care, experiencing partnerships with professionals, and satisfaction with services. They had decreased odds of having problems with referrals for specialty care, missing >6 school days because of illness (previous year), and visiting the emergency department more than twice in the previous 12 months (P <.001). Those who reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had decreased odds of the following: more than $500/y of out-of-pocket expenses, family financial burden, spending more than 4 hours/week coordinating care, and stopping/reducing work hours. CONCLUSIONS: Parental report of adequate CC was associated with favorable family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. Additional efforts are needed to discern which aspects of CC are most beneficial and for which subgroups of children with special health care needs.",
keywords = "Care coordination, Children with special health care needs, Family-centered care, Medical home, National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs",
author = "Turchi, {Renee M.} and Zekarias Berhane and Christina Bethell and Amber Pomponio and Richard Antonelli and Minkovitz, {Cynthia S}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2009-1255O",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "124",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "SUPPL. 4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Care coordination for CSHCN

T2 - Associations with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes

AU - Turchi, Renee M.

AU - Berhane, Zekarias

AU - Bethell, Christina

AU - Pomponio, Amber

AU - Antonelli, Richard

AU - Minkovitz, Cynthia S

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between receiving adequate care coordination (CC) with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Eligible subjects were the 88% of families asked about experience with CC, service use, and communication. Respondents also reported on demographic characteristics, health status, family-provider relations, and family/child outcomes. Weighted, multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to assess independent associations of adequate CC with outcomes. RESULTS: Among families with children with special health care needs asked about CC, 68.2% reported receiving some type of CC help. Of these, 59.2% reported receiving adequate CC help, and 40.8% reported inadequate CC. Families that reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had increased odds of receiving family-centered care, experiencing partnerships with professionals, and satisfaction with services. They had decreased odds of having problems with referrals for specialty care, missing >6 school days because of illness (previous year), and visiting the emergency department more than twice in the previous 12 months (P <.001). Those who reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had decreased odds of the following: more than $500/y of out-of-pocket expenses, family financial burden, spending more than 4 hours/week coordinating care, and stopping/reducing work hours. CONCLUSIONS: Parental report of adequate CC was associated with favorable family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. Additional efforts are needed to discern which aspects of CC are most beneficial and for which subgroups of children with special health care needs.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between receiving adequate care coordination (CC) with family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Eligible subjects were the 88% of families asked about experience with CC, service use, and communication. Respondents also reported on demographic characteristics, health status, family-provider relations, and family/child outcomes. Weighted, multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to assess independent associations of adequate CC with outcomes. RESULTS: Among families with children with special health care needs asked about CC, 68.2% reported receiving some type of CC help. Of these, 59.2% reported receiving adequate CC help, and 40.8% reported inadequate CC. Families that reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had increased odds of receiving family-centered care, experiencing partnerships with professionals, and satisfaction with services. They had decreased odds of having problems with referrals for specialty care, missing >6 school days because of illness (previous year), and visiting the emergency department more than twice in the previous 12 months (P <.001). Those who reported adequate compared with inadequate CC had decreased odds of the following: more than $500/y of out-of-pocket expenses, family financial burden, spending more than 4 hours/week coordinating care, and stopping/reducing work hours. CONCLUSIONS: Parental report of adequate CC was associated with favorable family-provider relations and family/child outcomes. Additional efforts are needed to discern which aspects of CC are most beneficial and for which subgroups of children with special health care needs.

KW - Care coordination

KW - Children with special health care needs

KW - Family-centered care

KW - Medical home

KW - National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=71749118865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=71749118865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2009-1255O

DO - 10.1542/peds.2009-1255O

M3 - Article

C2 - 19948609

AN - SCOPUS:71749118865

VL - 124

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - SUPPL. 4

ER -