Cardiovascular proteomics evolution and potential

D. Kent Arrell, Irina Neverova, Jennifer E. Van Eyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The development of proteomics is a timely one for cardiovascular research. Analyses at the organ, subcellular, and molecular levels have revealed dynamic, complex, and subtle intracellular processes associated with heart and vascular disease. The power and flexibility of proteomic analyses, which facilitate protein separation, identification, and characterization, should hasten our understanding of these processes at the protein level. Properly applied, proteomics provides researchers with cellular protein "inventories" at specific moments in time, making it ideal for documenting protein modification due to a particular disease, condition, or treatment. This is accomplished through the establishment of species- and tissue-specific protein databases, providing a foundation for subsequent proteomic studies. Evolution of proteomic techniques has permitted more thorough investigation into molecular mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease, facilitating identification not only of modified proteins but also of the nature of their modification. Continued development should lead to functional proteomic studies, in which identification of protein modification, in conjunction with functional data from established biochemical and physiological methods, has the ability to further our understanding of the interplay between proteome change and cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)763-773
Number of pages11
JournalCirculation Research
Volume88
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 27 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Proteomics
Proteins
Cardiovascular Diseases
Protein Databases
Proteome
Vascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Research Personnel
Equipment and Supplies
Research

Keywords

  • 2-D gel electrophoresis
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Molecular mechanism
  • Protein modification
  • Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Arrell, D. K., Neverova, I., & Van Eyk, J. E. (2001). Cardiovascular proteomics evolution and potential. Circulation Research, 88(8), 763-773.

Cardiovascular proteomics evolution and potential. / Arrell, D. Kent; Neverova, Irina; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

In: Circulation Research, Vol. 88, No. 8, 27.04.2001, p. 763-773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arrell, DK, Neverova, I & Van Eyk, JE 2001, 'Cardiovascular proteomics evolution and potential', Circulation Research, vol. 88, no. 8, pp. 763-773.
Arrell DK, Neverova I, Van Eyk JE. Cardiovascular proteomics evolution and potential. Circulation Research. 2001 Apr 27;88(8):763-773.
Arrell, D. Kent ; Neverova, Irina ; Van Eyk, Jennifer E. / Cardiovascular proteomics evolution and potential. In: Circulation Research. 2001 ; Vol. 88, No. 8. pp. 763-773.
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