Cardiorespiratory function before and after corrective surgery in pectus excavatum

Patricia Quigley, J. A. Haller, K. L. Jelus, G. M. Laughlin, C. L. Marcus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether pectus excavatum (PE) results in cardiopulmonary abnormalities, and whether surgical repair results in improvement. Methods: We performed pulmonary function testing and incremental exercise testing in 36 adolescents with PE (aged 16 ± 3 [SD] years) and 10 age-matched, healthy control subjects. Fifteen PE subjects were reexamined postoperatively, as were six control subjects. Results: Preoperatively, PE subjects had a significantly lower forced vital capacity than control subjects had (81% ± 14% vs 98% ± 9% of the predicted value; p <0.001). Chest computed tomography ratios of internal transverse to anteroposterior diameters correlated inversely with total lung capacity (r= -0.56; p 2 pulse did not differ between the two groups. Respiratory measurements during exercise were similar between the two groups. Postoperatively there was no change in forced vital capacity (as a percentage of the predicted value). The PE subjects exercised for a slightly longer period and had a slightly higher O2 pulse, whereas control subjects showed no change. Conclusion: Some subjects with PE have mild restrictive lung disease, which is not affected by surgical repair. Postoperatively they have a slight increase in exercise tolerance and O2 pulse, which suggests improved cardiac function during exercise. However, the clinical implications of this modest improvement are unclear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)638-643
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume128
Issue number5 I
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

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Funnel Chest
Vital Capacity
Exercise
Total Lung Capacity
Exercise Tolerance
Lung Diseases
Healthy Volunteers
Thorax
Tomography
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Cardiorespiratory function before and after corrective surgery in pectus excavatum. / Quigley, Patricia; Haller, J. A.; Jelus, K. L.; Laughlin, G. M.; Marcus, C. L.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 128, No. 5 I, 1996, p. 638-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quigley, Patricia ; Haller, J. A. ; Jelus, K. L. ; Laughlin, G. M. ; Marcus, C. L. / Cardiorespiratory function before and after corrective surgery in pectus excavatum. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 1996 ; Vol. 128, No. 5 I. pp. 638-643.
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