Cardiac disease associated with increased risk of nonamnestic cognitive impairment

Rosebud O. Roberts, Yonas E. Geda, David S. Knopman, Ruth H. Cha, V. Shane Pankratz, Bradley F. Boeve, Eric G. Tangalos, Robert J. Ivnik, Michelle M. Mielke, Ronald C. Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association of cardiac disease with amnestic and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and naMCI, respectively). Nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment, a putative precursor of vascular and other non-Alzheimer dementias, is hypothesized to have a vascular etiology. Design: A prospective, population-based, cohort study with a median 4.0 years of follow-up. Setting: Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants: A total of 2719 participants were evaluated at baseline and every 15 months using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. A diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. Cardiac disease at baseline was assessed from the participant's medical records. Main Outcome Measures: Incident MCI, aMCI, or naMCI. Results: Of 1450 participants without MCI or dementia at baseline, 366 developed MCI. Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 1.77 [95% CI, 1.16-2.72]). However, the association varied by sex (P=.02 for interaction). Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 3.07 [95% CI, 1.58-5.99]) for women but not for men (hazard ratio, 1.16 [95% CI, 0.68-1.99]). Cardiac disease was not associated with any type of MCI or with aMCI. Conclusions: Cardiac disease is an independent risk factor for naMCI; within-sex comparisons showed a stronger association for women. Prevention and management of cardiac disease and vascular risk factors may reduce the risk of naMCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-382
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA Neurology
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Diseases
Dementia
Vascular Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognition
Medical Records
Blood Vessels
Consensus
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Roberts, R. O., Geda, Y. E., Knopman, D. S., Cha, R. H., Pankratz, V. S., Boeve, B. F., ... Petersen, R. C. (2013). Cardiac disease associated with increased risk of nonamnestic cognitive impairment. JAMA Neurology, 70(3), 374-382. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.607

Cardiac disease associated with increased risk of nonamnestic cognitive impairment. / Roberts, Rosebud O.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Cha, Ruth H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Boeve, Bradley F.; Tangalos, Eric G.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Petersen, Ronald C.

In: JAMA Neurology, Vol. 70, No. 3, 2013, p. 374-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roberts, RO, Geda, YE, Knopman, DS, Cha, RH, Pankratz, VS, Boeve, BF, Tangalos, EG, Ivnik, RJ, Mielke, MM & Petersen, RC 2013, 'Cardiac disease associated with increased risk of nonamnestic cognitive impairment', JAMA Neurology, vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 374-382. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.607
Roberts RO, Geda YE, Knopman DS, Cha RH, Pankratz VS, Boeve BF et al. Cardiac disease associated with increased risk of nonamnestic cognitive impairment. JAMA Neurology. 2013;70(3):374-382. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.607
Roberts, Rosebud O. ; Geda, Yonas E. ; Knopman, David S. ; Cha, Ruth H. ; Pankratz, V. Shane ; Boeve, Bradley F. ; Tangalos, Eric G. ; Ivnik, Robert J. ; Mielke, Michelle M. ; Petersen, Ronald C. / Cardiac disease associated with increased risk of nonamnestic cognitive impairment. In: JAMA Neurology. 2013 ; Vol. 70, No. 3. pp. 374-382.
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abstract = "Objective: To investigate the association of cardiac disease with amnestic and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and naMCI, respectively). Nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment, a putative precursor of vascular and other non-Alzheimer dementias, is hypothesized to have a vascular etiology. Design: A prospective, population-based, cohort study with a median 4.0 years of follow-up. Setting: Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants: A total of 2719 participants were evaluated at baseline and every 15 months using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. A diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. Cardiac disease at baseline was assessed from the participant's medical records. Main Outcome Measures: Incident MCI, aMCI, or naMCI. Results: Of 1450 participants without MCI or dementia at baseline, 366 developed MCI. Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 1.77 [95{\%} CI, 1.16-2.72]). However, the association varied by sex (P=.02 for interaction). Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 3.07 [95{\%} CI, 1.58-5.99]) for women but not for men (hazard ratio, 1.16 [95{\%} CI, 0.68-1.99]). Cardiac disease was not associated with any type of MCI or with aMCI. Conclusions: Cardiac disease is an independent risk factor for naMCI; within-sex comparisons showed a stronger association for women. Prevention and management of cardiac disease and vascular risk factors may reduce the risk of naMCI.",
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AU - Geda, Yonas E.

AU - Knopman, David S.

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AU - Pankratz, V. Shane

AU - Boeve, Bradley F.

AU - Tangalos, Eric G.

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AU - Mielke, Michelle M.

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N2 - Objective: To investigate the association of cardiac disease with amnestic and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and naMCI, respectively). Nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment, a putative precursor of vascular and other non-Alzheimer dementias, is hypothesized to have a vascular etiology. Design: A prospective, population-based, cohort study with a median 4.0 years of follow-up. Setting: Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants: A total of 2719 participants were evaluated at baseline and every 15 months using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. A diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. Cardiac disease at baseline was assessed from the participant's medical records. Main Outcome Measures: Incident MCI, aMCI, or naMCI. Results: Of 1450 participants without MCI or dementia at baseline, 366 developed MCI. Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 1.77 [95% CI, 1.16-2.72]). However, the association varied by sex (P=.02 for interaction). Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 3.07 [95% CI, 1.58-5.99]) for women but not for men (hazard ratio, 1.16 [95% CI, 0.68-1.99]). Cardiac disease was not associated with any type of MCI or with aMCI. Conclusions: Cardiac disease is an independent risk factor for naMCI; within-sex comparisons showed a stronger association for women. Prevention and management of cardiac disease and vascular risk factors may reduce the risk of naMCI.

AB - Objective: To investigate the association of cardiac disease with amnestic and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and naMCI, respectively). Nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment, a putative precursor of vascular and other non-Alzheimer dementias, is hypothesized to have a vascular etiology. Design: A prospective, population-based, cohort study with a median 4.0 years of follow-up. Setting: Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants: A total of 2719 participants were evaluated at baseline and every 15 months using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. A diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. Cardiac disease at baseline was assessed from the participant's medical records. Main Outcome Measures: Incident MCI, aMCI, or naMCI. Results: Of 1450 participants without MCI or dementia at baseline, 366 developed MCI. Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 1.77 [95% CI, 1.16-2.72]). However, the association varied by sex (P=.02 for interaction). Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio, 3.07 [95% CI, 1.58-5.99]) for women but not for men (hazard ratio, 1.16 [95% CI, 0.68-1.99]). Cardiac disease was not associated with any type of MCI or with aMCI. Conclusions: Cardiac disease is an independent risk factor for naMCI; within-sex comparisons showed a stronger association for women. Prevention and management of cardiac disease and vascular risk factors may reduce the risk of naMCI.

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